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Head of Research Gives Workshop on Interactive Micro Learning

 
Wittenborg News
Head of Research Gives Workshop on Interactive Micro Learning
by Wittenborg News - Monday, 1 April 2019, 4:35 PM
 

Dr Nicolet Theunissen from Wittenborg with writer and inventor, David Allen.

Permanent Beta Share Vision on Innovation with Wittenborg Knowledge Hub


Wittenborg's Head of Research, Dr Nicolet Theunissen, recently participated in the Dutch symposium "Body, Mind & Machine!", organised by the innovation network Permanent Beta in Amersfoort.

The founders of Permanent Beta believe that the most exciting developments in today's society come about when art, technology and science meet. Hence, it aims to provide a platform where all three disciplines come together. Its slogan is: "Bridging Brains, Tech and Culture".

Theunissen gave a workshop entitled: "Microlearning, an exciting new way of learning that does not take place outside but during your daily life. Learn while you live your life. Discover a new tool that makes Interactive Micro-Learning (IML) possible." In the workshop she showed the IML she developed, using examples from different domains: personal development, support for digital low-literate people and safety exercises.

Theunissen said: "Their vision on innovation agrees with the vision of our research centre here at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences, being a knowledge hub. The Wittenborg Knowledge Hub is a dynamic environment where international lecturers, researchers and students bring in their knowledge, experience, skills and cultural background and gain new knowledge, skills and understanding."

She added: "All in all it was an inspiring symposium in which participants shared visions and ideas for our society."

The symposium ended with a Q & A session with David Allen, writer and inventor of the Getting Things Done Methodology and an authority in the fields of organisational and personal productivity. He answered questions from the audience in a very calm and relaxed way. For instance, emphasising that it is not about the perfect tool, but following five simple steps "that apply order to chaos".

WUP 1/4/2019
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press

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