Wittenborg Online News!

Marketing a City is Students' First Project Week Assignment

by Wittenborg News -

Marketing a City is Students' First Project Week Assignment

Students Must Create Website, Advising City of Apeldoorn How to Attract Businesses

https://www.wittenborg.eu/marketing-city-students-first-project-week-assignment.htm

More than 150 students from Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences participated in the kick-off of its first Project Week for the new academic year, which requires students to create a feasible website for the city of Apeldoorn, marketing itself as an attractive location for companies to settle in.

 

Marketing a City is Students' First Project Week Assignment

To get them started, students were treated to an energetic lecture from Wittenborg’s chair of the executive board, Peter Birdsall, and CEO, Maggie Feng, on how different cities tackled their marketing initiatives and why it is important. The group consisted of both first-year and second-year students. 

Birdsall told students some cities – like Amsterdam and Venice – have been “too successful” in their marketing campaign to tourists and now find it hard to cope with the huge numbers of visitors, including complaints from residents. But while Amsterdam has a population of more than 800,000, there are smaller Dutch cities, like Apeldoorn with its 160,000 residents, that are trying to attract more visitors and investors.

Marketing a City is Students' First Project Week Assignment

Birdsall said one of the key reasons for marketing a city is economics. He cited the example of Wittenborg, which since 2010 is estimated to have contributed about 88 million to the Dutch economy - mainly via its international students. Most of it would have been spent in Apeldoorn, where its headquarters are located. The Dutch Central Planning Bureau (CPB) calculates that non-EU students spend up to €82,400 each during and after their studies in the Netherlands. For European students it is between €5,000 - €17,000. “It validates what we are doing here,” Birdsall said.

 Students heard that other economic reasons for marketing a city would be to secure government funding, attract businesses, tourism and events like sport events. “Marketing helps with the reputation of the city which in turn is good for economic growth.”

Marketing a City is Students' First Project Week Assignment

Birdsall also gave students examples of how cities like Las Vegas, Jerusalem, Johannesburg and Eastbourne in the UK market themselves and how targeted they are in appealing to the market segment they want to attract.  

After the assignment, students must present their work in groups.  

WUP 18/9/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content

From Lawyer to Wittenborg Student

by Wittenborg News -

From Lawyer to Student at Wittenborg

Mexican Student wants to Make Career Switch from Criminal Law to Hospitality

https://www.wittenborg.eu/lawyer-wittenborg-student.htm

For three years Dulce Olivia Cruz Nuñez practised criminal law in Mexico City – this week she returned to being a student - at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences to do an MBA in Hospitality & Service Management, starting a fresh chapter in her life. 

Dulce is among more than 100 new students from all over the world starting with their classes at Wittenborg as the new academic year kicks off. 

Leaving her job as a high-flying lawyer to be a student again feels like a big step, so why did she do it? “As a young, female lawyer, I faced quite a lot of sexual harassment by men in powerful positions. Though, I will admit, the job also opened a lot of doors for me.”

Eight years ago she also opened a hostel for foreign travellers in Mexico, which is going well. “I wanted to deepen my knowledge about the hospitality sector, hence my decision to study abroad. And I really love to study. In that way I’m a bit of a nerd!”

Why did she choose to study in the Netherlands? “Leading a sustainable lifestyle seems very important to the Dutch and I like that. Also, life is always busy in Mexico City – there are 11 million people – and I wanted a break from that.”

WUP 18/9/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content

Wittenborg's Head of Research Wants to Double Positive Behaviour

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg's Head of Research Wants to Double Positive Behaviour

Goals in Line with that of UN

https://www.wittenborg.eu/wittenborgs-head-research-wants-double-positive-behaviour.htm

Doubling positive behavior worldwide by 2030 - this is the goal that Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences' Head of Research, Dr Nicolet Theunissen, has set for her company Future Life Research which celebrated its 5th anniversary recently. In the meantime she has also launched a Dutch version of the BetterYourself.app - a platform which helps people develop more positive behaviour. The English version is soon to follow. 

Theunissen was recently interviewed by De Stentor newspaper about her work as a scientist and entrepreneur. Before launching her company, Theunissen worked for years as a senior researcher at TNO developing training innovations. "All the knowledge I collected and the research I have subsequently done, I have applied to build a platform where people can work on positive behaviour," she told the newspaper. 

Though she acknowledges the ambition to double good behaviour in the next 10 years might sound "absurd", she believes it complements the sustainable development goals set out by the UN towards ending poverty, inequality and climate change by 2030. "This will only be reached if people really go for it by adopting a positive behavioural attitude."

Theunissen holds a PhD in Medicine (Health Psychology) and a master's degree in Developmental Psychology. She joined Wittenborg last year as Head of Research. 

WUP 16/9/2019
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press

 


Student Column: The Power of Critical and Creative Thinking

by Wittenborg News -

Student Column: The Power of Critical and Creative Thinking

Creative Thinking will Future-Proof You

https://www.wittenborg.eu/student-column-power-critical-and-creative-thinking.htm

"Houston, we've got a problem."  These famous words were spoken by astronaut Jim Lovell from space in April 1970.   Apollo 13 was a spacecraft with three astronauts, sent to space on a mission to explore the moon.  Fifty-five hours into the mission, an oxygen tank exploded causing loss of oxygen and power to the command centre of the spacecraft.  

The lead flight director for Mission Control, Gene Kranz, told the ground crew at NASA that failure was not an option.  They had to come up with a successful plan to bring the astronauts home safely.  This rescue mission was not a test of technological or engineering prowess.  This was a real-life scenario.  The success of the rescue mission depended on the wits of two teams:  the three-men crew of astronauts and the team of computer operators, technicians and engineers at the Houston NASA centre on earth.  

Development of creative thinking as well as critical thinking is pertinent to overcoming the challenges of the world - with its many uncertainties and complex environmental, social and economic issues.  Creative thinking allows an individual to resolve issues using creative and innovative ways.  This requires the individual to view problems in different directions and perspectives, and to find various solutions with all their accompanying pros and cons.  It requires both divergent and convergent thinking, which means brainstorming ideas in many directions, and then coming up with an unlimited number of solutions before arriving at the best solution.  

One Olive Away from Bankruptcy

Most of the times, solutions to problems are right in front of our eyes but we fail to see them.  Take for example the case of American Airlines.  Thirty years ago, in the 1980s, American Airlines was looking for ways to cut costs.  While many other airline companies started to lay off workers to cut costs, a staff member from American Airlines suggested taking off one olive from the salads served in-flight.  It seemed like a stupid idea literally and people asked how one olive could save the company from bankruptcy.  That suggestion was not looked down on by management and through calculations they found out that by simply removing one olive, the airline saved a staggering $40,000 in a single year.  Based on this lesson learned, Northwest Airlines followed suit and saved $500,000 a year by slicing its limes into 16 slices instead of 10.  Creative thinking skills help us to view things in different perspectives and ways and solve problems.

In the case of Apollo 13, the two teams brainstormed ideas on how to power up the spacecraft to bring it back to earth.  The astronauts had to endure fever, thirst, lack of sleep, rising levels of carbon dioxide, as well as radio silence, freezing temperatures, and darkness so as to stockpile the electrical power to boost the craft for the return journey.   Finally, the solution was derived through many creative solutions and the crew members safely landed in the Pacific Ocean.  The teams had converted chaos and crisis inside the spacecraft into opportunities and not failures.  There was no available fix-it kit for the crew, no concrete solutions that were sure to succeed, and they had to work with limited time, space, technology and resources.  All these were made possible through creative and critical thinking, brainpower, talents, skills and know-how.

Creative thinking skill is as pertinent as survival skill.  It is this skill that led primitive man to develop fire, shape tools to hunt, invent clothes using animal skins, harness nature’s energy and create technologies.  And it is this skill that can help us advance into the uncertain future and survive in it.  Sometimes, it is only under the stress of limits that new ideas are shaped and developed.  People often tell us to think ‘out-of-the-box’, but at times thinking ‘inside the box’ is just as creative and innovative, and helps us to cope with crisis under pressure.

Today and the future’s job markets call for creative-minded engineers, managers, designers, researchers and individuals to leverage on the technological advancements for success.  What separates you from the next person is no longer just your academic certificate but your creative and critical thinking competencies.  

So how can we develop creative and critical thinking skills?  These two skills are not innate to everyone and they can be developed as a skill.  Our education system encourages the development of these skills through a variety of curricula, but they can only do so much.  There is almost never a clear-cut answer to a single problem and there is no specific way of teaching them.  But here are some tips on how you can develop creative and critical thinking skills.

Be analytical and critical:  Look around and start analysing critically the things around you, be it physical things or real-life issues.  Look at your mobile phone and ask yourself why it works the way it works.  Think of what other ways you can get rid of that annoying housefly without using the insecticide spray or smacking it with the fly swatter.  Read up on real issues like pollution and ask critically what can be done to reduce it.  Be critical and delve into your deeper thoughts and try to find solutions.

Get out of your comfort zone:  Some people don’t want to try new things because they are afraid of changes or nervous about uncertainties.  Be adventurous, but of course not to the extent of endangering life.  Getting out of your familiar zone can expand your perspectives and nourish your creativity and critical thinking skills. If you like reading romance books, try a different genre like mysteries or science fiction.  If you like football or tennis, try playing chess or canoeing.  In the beginning, it may not seem comfortable, but through perseverance, these new things may be very helpful to you in the future.

Travelling:  Going to new places and learning about new cultures and ways of living can broaden your knowledge about things which you have never encountered in your own country or city.  Crossing cultural and geographical boundaries will give you greater insight into how people across the world think or operate and come up with ingenious solutions to solve their problems.

Be a “Jack of all trades”:  Conventional wisdom says it is better to specialise in one field and be an expert in it, rather than studying widely in many different fields and being a master of none.  Recent studies have shown that learning across multiple fields provides an information advantage which allows you to use all the information to come up with better workable solutions.  Elon Musk, the multibillionaire who has owned companies in four separate fields (technology - PayPal & OpenAI, energy - SolarCity, transportation - Tesla, and aerospace - SpaceX), is a great example of someone whose expertise ranges from rocket science, engineering, physics and artificial intelligence to solar power and energy.  He studies widely in many different fields and connects those fields to come up with innovative ideas and solutions.

Reading:  Reading is the window to all kinds of knowledge.  Since he was 10 years old, Elon Musk read through two books per day in various disciplines.  His thirst for knowledge allowed him to get exposed to a variety of subjects which he had never learned in school.

Creative and critical thinking skills can be developed and refined over time.  There is no expiry date so you can start now and continue to develop them throughout your life.  The phrase ‘I’m not creative or I’m not good at problem solving’ is not true at all.  Anyone can be inspired, and anyone can come up with creative solutions.  The key is to equip yourself with more knowledge, experience and skills, and be more engaged in deep thinking.  So, don’t be afraid, and start being critical and creative.

WUP 15/11/2019
by Hanna Albdelwahab
© Wittenborg University Press

Related Content

Wittenborg Student Lands Job at Indonesian Embassy

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg Student Lands Job at Indonesian Embassy

Volunteering Makes you a Strong Job Candidate, says Student Who Got Internship at Embassy

https://www.wittenborg.eu/wittenborg-student-lands-job-indonesian-embassy.htm

Volunteering can make you a stronger job candidate if you are hoping to get hired. Wittenborg student Bertha Tanaem is proof of this theory - she just landed a great internship at the Indonesian Embassy in The Hague. 

How did the internship come about?

"As a student from Indonesia in the Netherlands, you can join the Indonesian Student Association in The Netherlands called PPI Belanda, which has 16 locations throughout the country. Since my first year, I have played volleyball for PPI in Wageningen against other branches of the organisation. I also like to volunteer, so did a number of volunteering jobs for PPI Belanda and others that interest me.

"Playing volleyball and volunteering helped me to establish a network of contacts - also in the Indonesian embassy. During one event, I mentioned to embassy staff members that I am looking for an internship starting in August. And here I am."

What does the job entail?

"Primarily, as an intern in Economic Affairs, I do research, analyse and write reports regarding economic development in the Netherlands - macro-economics, business and investment. Secondly, I support any task that needs to be done, such as preparing meeting material, attending meetings, and supporting the events coordinator for upcoming events."

How were the first weeks on the job?

"My internship is for 3 months (full-time). It has been a while since I've had a 9 - 5 routine. The first two weeks were super hard, and I had to adjust to the new routine, including the daily commute from Zwolle, where I am living, to The Hague."

How do you apply what you learned at Wittenborg to your job?

"I just smiled when, during a recent market intelligence meeting, a PowerPoint slide about SWOT analysis popped up. Just when I thought I could get away from PESTLE & SWOT analysis, these two frameworks never left me! Wittenborg allows me to explore the theoretical way of doing business that I can apply to my own business, Ayotupas Handmade. At the embassy, I combine the two."

WUP 11/11/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press


Higher fees and Fewer Scholarships for Non-EU Students at Public Uni's

by Wittenborg News -

Higher fees and Fewer Scholarships for Non-EU Students at Public Uni's

Draft Legislation to Limit Influx of Foreign Students and English Goes to Dutch Parliament - Council of State criticizes - saying the law will be ineffective

https://www.wittenborg.eu/higher-fees-and-fewer-scholarships-non-eu-students-public-unis.htm

Fewer scholarships and higher fees are what non-EU students planning to study at public universities in the Netherlands will face, should new cabinet proposals to deal with the influx of international students, come into force.

Unclear

It is unclear whether the proposals, introduced in a letter to parliament by the Dutch minister of education, culture and science, Ingrid van Engelshoven, will also apply to privately funded institutions like Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences that do not receive public funding from the state, and thus set their own fees.  

Wittenborg's executive chair, Peter Birdsall comments "I think that the minister assumes that independent universities would always ask a higher fee than public ones. This is not always the case, but we shouldn't be worried that these measures will effect us in any way. Being privately funded means being independent of these sorts of measures".

It is unclear whether the proposals, introduced in a letter to parliament by the Dutch minister of education, culture and science, Ingrid van Engelshoven, will also apply to private institutions like Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences, that do not receive public funding from the state and, thus, set their own fees. 

Council of State Critical

The proposals are part of the Bill on Language and Accessibility, which was submitted to the House of Representatives (Tweede Kamer) on Friday. However the Council of State (Raad van State) which advises government and parliament on new legislation has stated that the proposed law will have little effect on limiting the numbers of international students, and that the terms used in the proposal are vague and would actually make it easier for Dutch universities to  

Despite the fact that international students give the Dutch economy a huge boost by contributing thousands of euro to state coffers, there has been mounting concern about the meteoric rise in their numbers, as well as the steady growth of English-taught programmes, especially master's programmes of which about 70% are now offered in English. Foreign students currently account for 11.5% of the total student population in the Netherlands - twice the number 10 years ago.  

According to Van Engelshoven, the number of international students cannot be allowed to get out of hand.  

Non-EU Students Coming to Holland Face Higher Fees and Fewer Scholarships at Public Universities Under New Bill

"An interdepartmental policy study has shown that this will put pressure on the financing, quality and accessibility of education. To create more balance, cabinet wants to review the rules which guide education not offered in Dutch, increase the minimum study fees for students from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), and introduce tools to put a cap (numerus fixus) on the non-Dutch pathways of programmes."

Currently, the number of foreign students in the Netherlands is five times higher than that of Dutch students studying abroad. In pursuit of a more balanced situation, the ministry wants to redirect funds away from Nuffic Nesos abroad to strengthen the knowledge diplomacies within its embassies. The number of Holland Scholarships will also be reduced, while scholarships for Dutch students to study abroad will be doubled.  

The Bill proposes that a numerus fixus does not have to apply to an entire programme, but is possible for a non-Dutch pathway of a programme where there is a capacity problem, subject to approval by the minister. This would guarantee the availability of the Dutch pathway of the programme.  

Tution Fee Rise

Student fees  for non-EEA students will also be regulated by the Bill, meaning students will have to pay a minimum fee equal to the maximum fee for EER students. Science Guide reported in July that bachelor's students from outside the EEA would pay at least €7,612 in tuition fees, or €15,178 if attending a university of technology. Master's programmes will cost a minimum of €29,452 year.

Wittenborg's fees are currently at €7,500 per year for bachelor's and set to rise to €8,900 in 2020. Total tuition master's fees vary between €12,600 for MSc and €14,300 -  €18,300 for MBM and MBA.

Student fees for non-EEA students will also be regulated by the Bill, meaning students will have to pay a minimum fee equal to the maximum fee for EEA students. Science Guide reported in July that bachelor's students from outside the EEA would pay at least €7,612 in tuition fees, or €15,178 if attending a university of technology. Master's programmes will cost a minimum of €29,452 year.

WUP 9/11/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press


Foreign Students Give Dutch Economy a Huge Boost

by Wittenborg News -

Foreign Students Give Dutch Economy a Huge Boost

Wittenborg Students Estimated to Have Added 88 Million to Dutch Economy since 2010

https://www.wittenborg.eu/foreign-students-give-dutch-economy-huge-boost.htm

New statistics from the Dutch Central Planning Bureau (CPB) has revealed that international student contribute thousands of euros to the Dutch economy. This puts paid to the  idea that foreign students are a huge financial burden to the Netherlands.  

Non-EU students are the most lucrative, the Dutch financial daily Het Financieele Dagblad reported - they are estimated to contribute up to €82 400 to the Dutch treasury during and after their studies.  Three quarters of students are from within Europe. These students pay the same fees as Dutch students and in total they contribute between  €5 000 - €17 000 to the Dutch treasury.  

Wittenborg  

Meanwhile, Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences - which is one of the most international institutions of higher education in the Netherlands - has made its own calculations. Wittenborg's chair of the executive board, Peter Birdsall, estimates that students have added about 88 million to the city of Apeldoorn in main and the Dutch economy in general since its move from Deventer in 2010.  

Apeldoorn Economy Boost   

 "We have always used the calculation that on average one student contributes about €18 000 per registered year to the Dutch economy, and a lot of that goes to the Apeldoorn economy. Think of expenses like accommodation, salaries, shopping etc. This does not include the fact that many students work, thus also contributing to the economy in that sense. Since 2010 we have had an approximate total of 4934 student ‘year registrations’ and 2019 is not yet finished, hence the approximate."

Birdsall says Wittenborg expect to generate around €20 million per year towards the economy, adding up to around 200 million over 10 years.

The new numbers defies the populist idea generated the past few years that international students puts pressure on the Dutch economy. Het Financieele Dagblad quotes the chairman of the National Student Union, Tariq Sewbaransingh, who told NOS in 2018 that international students don't pay tax, therefore they don't contribute to the treasury.  

The Dutch Minister of Education, Ingrid van Engelshoven, is expected to send a letter to the Dutch House of Representatives (Tweede Kamer) outlining the future of internationalisation after lots of controversy about the number of foreign students in the Netherlands and the increase of English language programmes.  

Last year about 85 955 international students came to study in the Netherlands, making up 11,5% of the total student population. Compare this to 2006 when the number was around 31 000.

WUP 8/9/2019 
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press


WUAS visits Tourism & Management College in Austria

by Wittenborg News -

WUAS visits Tourism & Management College in Austria

WUAS visits International College of Tourism and Management in Bad Vöslau, Austria.

https://www.wittenborg.eu/wuas-visits-tourism-management-college-austria.htm

Last week representatives of Wittenborg visited the International College of Tourism and Management in Bad Vöslau, to discuss plans to work together running WUAS hospitality business administration (HBA) top-up programmes in Austria at the ITM campus.

ITM

ITM was established in 1986, and is an Austrian College offering nationally accredited diploma's in hospitality & tourism.

It is located in the College Garden Hotel which is a fully functioning conference hotel, where students can gain work experience during their studies, before continuing to further internships and various partner university to finish their degrees.

Bad Vöslau - near Vienna

Bad Vöslau is a spa town in the Lower Austria federal state of Austria, 30 minutes from Vienna central railway station. It is also known as the centre of the Austrian red wine cultivation. As its name suggests Bad Vöslau is also a thermal spa and supports hotels and resorts. The spa town also produces its own brand of mineral water 'Vöslauer' one of Austria's most well known mineral waters.

WUP 6/9/2019
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press


Netherlands Viewed as "Tolerant" by New International Students

by Wittenborg News -

To Study in a Peaceful Country like the Netherlands is a Privilege, Says Iranian Student

https://www.wittenborg.eu/netherlands-viewed-tolerant-new-international-students.htm

International students view the Netherlands as more tolerant and “immigrant friendly” than other European countries, a quick survey among new students at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences has revealed.

Students were probed on the reasons why they chose to study in the Netherlands as opposed to other countries in Europe like Germany or the UK. The Dutch are also seen as more committed to leading a sustainable, environmentally-friendly lifestyle, and keen on sport and healthy living.

Netherlands Viewed as "Tolerant" by New International Students

"Quality of Dutch Education on Par with that of UK and US"

Giti Irantaj from Iran, who is about to start her second master's degree at Wittenborg, says the quality of education in the Netherlands is comparable to the US and UK. “But the lifestyle here seems to be better. The Dutch are more tolerant and friendly towards foreigners. It also looks easier to find a job given the ageing of the Dutch population.” Before coming to the Netherlands Irantaj lived for 4 years in Turkey where she obtained an MBA. At Wittenborg she will do a Master of Business Management (MBM) in Digital Marketing and Communication.

Netherlands Viewed as "Tolerant" by New International Students

"I Want to Work for Microsoft One Day"

Rongai Torongo from Zimbabwe says he chose the Netherlands because: “It seems more accepting of different cultures. Tuition fees are also more affordable than other countries and the Netherlands has an international vibe which I like. After graduation I do see myself working in an international setting, which is one of the ways I think Wittenborg will prepare me for my career. I have big ambitions – I want to be the Chief Information Officer at a company like Microsoft.” Torongo, who just graduated from high school, will do an IBA in Information Management at Wittenborg.

Netherlands Viewed as "Tolerant" by New International Students

"I Want to Learn how European Countries Do Business"

Peruvian student Lady Arotoma Francia worked as an analyst for one of the biggest banks in Peru, BBVA. After doing a 6-month foundation programme she will gain direct entry as a final phase IBA student in Financial Services Management. “I have been to the Netherlands 4 times and I find the people very friendly and environmentally conscious. I would love the opportunity to gain work experience here in the Netherlands and study how European companies do business.”

 

Netherlands Viewed as "Tolerant" by New International Students

"I don't Want to Be a Millionaire. I Just Want Peace."

Mohammad Rahimy Hamidabad from Iran is another direct entry student who will complete the final phase of the IBA in Economics & Management. Asked why he chose to study in the Netherlands, he simply said: “I want peace. Living in Iran means you are constantly under pressure. The sanctions imposed by the US against Iran make everything worse. I have been in the Netherlands for two weeks and can hardly believe how calm life is here. I could not bear the situation in Iran any longer. I don’t want to be a millionaire. I just want peace.” Hamidabad has a degree in electrical engineering obtained in Iran and hopes to find work in the Netherlands after graduation.

WUP 3/9/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content

Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team

by Wittenborg News -

Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team

Wittenborg's Lasantha de Silva Crowned Man of the Match in Cricket Match

https://www.wittenborg.eu/nail-biting-win-wittenborg-cricket-team.htm

The WUAS cricket team triumphed over the Gelre Cricket Club in a nail-biting T20-match this weekend at the Zupthen cricket grounds. T20 means both sides have a single innings each, restricted to 20 overs. Each side consists of 11 players.

Wittenborg batted first, scoring an impressive 123/6 in 20 overs. De Silva was Wittenborg’s star batsman with an innings of 56, eventually awarded Man of the Match. The WUAS team managed to restrict Gelre to 119/8 in 20 overs. The strongest bowlers were Salman Malik who took 4/10 and Umar Khan with 2/13.

 

Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team

De Silva commented afterwards: “It was a very competitive match which was dragged on until the last ball with 5 runs to win. Umar Khan from Wittenborg bowled out Gelre's highest scoring batsman, Anjana Kadirappulige (38), in the last ball...”

It's just Cricket

Though cricket is not widely played in Europe – except England – it has a huge following in warmer countries like India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. 

Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team

The WUAS team were supported by Wittenborg CEO, Maggie Feng, Wittenborg’s chair of the executive board, Peter Birdsall, Wittenborg’s University of Brighton coordinator, Myra Qiu and lecturer, Daniel O’Connel. 

The team consisted of Lasantha de Silva (Captain), Dr Rauf Abdul (vice-captain), Sohaib Ejaz, Salman Malik, Vikram Athavale, Shivam Kumar, Yasir Khan, Umar Khan, Hashim Khan, Ikram Raz (wicket-keeper) and Haseeb Mirza. 

People who are interested in joining Wittenborg’s winning team, can contact the Front Desk at frontdesk@wittenborg.eu.

WUP 2/9/2019
by Anesca Smith 
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content


Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team
Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team
Nail-Biting Win for Wittenborg Cricket Team


Older topics...