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Wittenborg Says Goodbye to Senior Financial Administrator Daphne Wang

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg Says Goodbye to Senior Financial Administrator Daphne Wang

Wittenborg Says Goodbye to Senior Financial Administrator Daphne Wang

Having joined Wittenborg in 2011, Wang Helped the School Grow and will Be Missed by Colleagues

In the 11 years Daphne Wang worked as Wittenborg’s Senior Financial Administrator, the school grew significantly, and part of this success was due to her hard work and dedication, as well as her expertise in the fields of finance and accountancy. Having recently decided to pursue other ventures, Wang will be missed by her colleagues, who organised a farewell lunch for her on 27 June.

Originally from China, Wang studied English at the Beijing Normal College of Foreign Languages. In 1997, she moved to the Netherlands to study for a bachelor’s degree in Business Economy at Saxion University of Applied Sciences, where she was one of the first Chinese students ever to enrol.

Wittenborg Says Goodbye to Senior Financial Administrator Daphne Wang

While studying at Saxion, Wang had English lessons from Peter Birdsall, who would eventually become Wittenborg’s president. Years later, she met the school’s CEO Maggie Feng through a common friend and ended up getting a job at the institution. “The fact that I already knew Peter influenced my decision to work for Wittenborg, and I am glad I made that choice, because I had a wonderful time there; that is why I stayed for such a long time,” she says.

As Senior Financial Administrator, Wang was responsible for all kinds of financial work in Wittenborg’s operational area, including the preparation of detailed reports and statements. In her view, the most rewarding – as well as challenging – aspect of this job were the many opportunities for gradual and continuous learning, and she adds that she always tried to do her best when performing her tasks.

“I will really miss all the nice colleagues I had at Wittenborg; we were like a big family, and I am very happy about how much the school has grown over the last years, with so many new students and staff members. I hope that Wittenborg will go on growing and getting stronger, and I wish all the best to everyone there,” she stresses.

Wittenborg Says Goodbye to Senior Financial Administrator Daphne Wang

President of Wittenborg Peter Birdsall highlights that the school went from approximately 150 students when Wang joined to 1,200 students enrolled last year. “Daphne walked into Wittenborg when we had just moved to the Aventus Building, and she left shortly before we moved to the Brinklaan building, so that is a nice synchronicity. We were a small team when she joined and we have now become a quite large team; it has been a great run, with plenty of memorable moments. It is a big jump to go from one company to another after 11 years, and I wish her the best of luck and much success,” he said.

According to Student Registrar Florian Oosterberg, among Wang’s most admirable qualities was her dedication to work and Wittenborg, as well as her honesty and straightforwardness. “We worked together for more than eight years; she was friendly and had a good dose of humour. I will miss Daphne as a part of the Wittenborg team and wish her all the best!”

HR & Immigration Administrator Mahesan Suntharesan described Wang as an extremely knowledgeable and amiable colleague, adding that during the period when he worked at Wittenborg’s Finance Department he viewed her as a mentor. “Daphne taught me a lot, not only about financial procedures, but also about skills that are important for both my professional and personal life. She has strong work ethics and puts in a lot of effort, and she encouraged me to learn the Dutch language so that I could have more opportunities and integrate easily into Dutch society. Among other things, Daphne advised me to always remember the following Dutch saying: ‘Een dag niet gelachen, is een dag niet geleefd’, which means ‘A day without laughter is a day wasted’. I am sure she will be successful wherever she goes, and I am rooting for her.”

WUP 17/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press


Wittenborg Graduate Opens Successful Nail Salon in Amsterdam

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg Graduate Opens Successful Nail Salon in Amsterdam

Wittenborg Graduate Opens Successful Nail Salon in Amsterdam

Carolina Lopez Roque Gets Inspiration from Five-Star Hotels to Provide High-Quality Services

For Wittenborg graduate Carolina Lopez Roque, quitting her job in the hospitality industry to start a new career as the owner of the Brigi Nails salon, in Amsterdam, was not an easy choice to make. “If you are an entrepreneur, you must know your value, and this is the most difficult thing. You need to believe in yourself, have the courage and take the risks. It took me some time to learn that, but after making that decision things have grown so fast,” she says.

Originally from Almeria, Spain, Lopez Roque came to the Netherlands ten years ago, to live with her Dutch partner at the time. At first, because she could not speak any English, she was only able to get low-paid jobs in restaurants and hotels. In order to have access to better opportunities and also inspired by her ex-boyfriend, who was pursuing a hospitality degree in The Hague, Lopez Roque decided to study hotel management. “This was a last-minute decision, because it was already September and I had checked many schools, but all of their applications were already closed, which meant I would have to wait for another year to be able to enrol. But then I read about Wittenborg, and the fact that they have six entry dates was very convenient for me. So, after having a look into that, I liked the school and decided to study there,” she explains.

Having obtained a bachelor’s degree in International Hospitality Management, Lopez Roque highlights that her studies provided her with multiple skills and competencies that would prove useful over the course of her career. “One of my most significant achievements was to become fluent in English. I came to the Netherlands without knowing a word of English, and so my level was very basic when I started the programme, and I failed most of the modules in the first year, before I finally managed to improve. Eventually, I learned many other useful things; the business modules taught me a lot about taxes, as well as how to deal with finances and spreadsheets. And I also developed crucial research and investigation skills, which enabled me to start my own business and get to where I am now.”

During her studies, Lopez Roque did an internship at the Park Hotel, in Amsterdam, where she worked as a housekeeping team leader – an experience which she says made her learn, in practice, how hotels work. “After I graduated, I worked at another hotel for six years. There, I started as a housekeeping team leader and then moved to the front office, where I also became a team leader. When you work in five-star hotels, you work to the clock, facing a lot of pressure; I learned how to manage clients, how to handle complaints and how to get everything ready on time, in line with high quality standards. It was quite demanding.”

Wittenborg Graduate Opens Successful Nail Salon in Amsterdam

Starting a New Career

With the goal of making some extra money and also pursuing a new hobby, Lopez Roque started taking manicure classes four years ago. Soon, she went from doing her friends’ nails to having a bigger customer base, and decided to rent a small place in order to tend to her clients. Having changed to the night shift at the hotel, the entrepreneur started working from 23:00 to 07:00 at her regular job, while doing nails between 10:00 and 18:00, in what she describes as a “completely exhausting” routine.

After a year doing both things, she had enough clients and was making enough money as a manicure to leave the hospitality industry. Two weeks later, however, the lockdown started, initially catching her by surprise. During the two months she had to stay home, relying on her savings, Lopez Roque decided to use her free time to learn more about marketing, also building up her Instagram profile and getting in touch with influencers. “On top of that, I signed up for some online manicure courses taught by Russians, because they are the best in the field. The videos were entirely in Russian, but they had subtitles which I would translate into English or Spanish, thanks to Google Translate. Those courses taught me many advanced techniques that I now teach at my salon,” she points out.

Wittenborg Graduate Opens Successful Nail Salon in Amsterdam

With the end of the lockdown, the entrepreneur reopened her salon and her clients returned. Additionally, she created an account on Treatwell – a platform on which clients can book appointments at beauty salons – and started some partnerships with social media influencers, which brought her many new customers. Currently, Lopez Roque employs two other professionals. She plans to grow her business, but says she prefers waiting until the pandemic and other sources of instability – such as the war in Ukraine – are definitely over.

According to Lopez Roque, her background in hospitality has enabled her to offer higher quality services to her clients. “Because I worked in hotels where I was talking to people all the time, I developed these social skills that have made it possible for me to bring the five-star hotel experience to my nail salon. I treat my customers nicely, by making them a cappuccino and listening to them talk about their lives, while I tell funny stories about my own life. This way, they have fun being there.”

She adds that customers are happy to pay more when they have access to better treatment. “At the beginning, when I was desperate to find customers, I took lots of cheap clients, and those are the ones who complain the most. Then I realised that by being confident about my skills and offering high quality services, I manage to attract people who are willing to pay more in exchange for excellence.”

WUP 15/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

Making a Difference: Wittenborg Graduate Starts Successful Career and Conducts Volunteer Projects

by Wittenborg News -

Making a Difference: Wittenborg Graduate Starts Successful Career and Conducts Volunteer Projects

Wittenborg Graduate Starts Successful Career and Conducts Volunteer Projects

Iranian Graduate Farnoosh Dabiri Seeking to Expand Personal and Professional Horizons

By moving from Iran to the Netherlands, Wittenborg graduate Farnoosh Dabiri has had the opportunity to greatly expand her professional horizons and experience a diverse and international business environment. Dabiri, who completed an MBA degree in International Management in 2021, points out that she decided to pursue the programme because she wanted to develop her career as a project manager. “Back in Iran, I had previously worked as a project manager in the petrochemical industry, but I wanted to learn more about topics such as sustainability and corporate responsibility.”

Among other reasons, the graduate highlights that she chose Wittenborg due to the quality of its teaching and because it is a truly international school, adding that its multiple entry dates are convenient for students. “This journey has taught me not only about sustainability and its role in education and business, but also about what studying at Wittenborg entails in terms of people, culture and values. I had the chance to learn a lot from many amazing people, and I am especially grateful to my classmate and friend Peter Kafatia and my supervisor Dr Joop Remmé. On top of that, taking part in the programme made me develop important transferable skills like learning agility, working under pressure, teamwork, communication and critical thinking, which have helped me achieve my professional goals.”

While studying for her degree, Dabiri did an internship at Unilever’s global sustainability team, an experience which she says enabled her to apply, in practice, the new skills she had acquired at Wittenborg. In this role, she was involved in various initiatives conducted internationally by the company. Moreover, Dabiri also acted as a liaison between different Unilever brands and conducted research on the company’s competitors, analysing the actions they were taking in the field of corporate social responsibility.

“I got to know Unilever through some of the projects we did at Wittenborg, so the name became quite familiar, and I was really impressed by the way that the company was doing business, in terms of corporate responsibility. Essentially, what I did as an intern was to propose strategies and create a road map to help equip 10 million young people with soft and hard skills, with the goal of raising their level of employability by 2030. I also worked on other initiatives that were focused on topics such as small and medium enterprises (SMI) and supplier diversity and inclusion (SDI), as well as the Dove Masterbrand project, which is aimed at developing girls’ skills and self-esteem,” she says.

Five days after graduating, Dabiri got a job offer from Emergo by UL, one of the largest global consultancy firms in the medical devices sector. The graduate explains that she had applied for a position advertised by the company on LinkedIn, adding that students can only benefit from keeping detailed and updated online profiles and CVs. As Emergo by UL’s international project manager, Dabiri is responsible for managing cross-functional projects that require collaboration between multiple regulatory consultants and project managers. Additionally, she allocates resources and sets milestones for each project – based on its specific requirements – and takes care of general administrative tasks. “During my time at Wittenborg, I have learned that the best project you can work on is yourself. I believe that this is absolutely helping me in my career as a project manager,” she stresses.

Wittenborg Graduate Starts Successful Career and Conducts Volunteer Projects

Art & Volunteer Work

Dabiri is also an artist, specialising in portraits. Having started drawing when she was a child, she later took lessons and became a professional, selling her artworks and organising exhibitions in Iran. “Instead of drawing portraits, I intend my work to reflect people’s lives; I want to go beyond just drawing their faces,” she highlights.

With the proceeds of her activity, Dabiri has developed multiple volunteer initiatives in Iran, including a project that provided lower-income households and vulnerable children with food and another initiative that purchased television sets, stoves and refrigerators for families in need. She explains that her motivation to do volunteer work started when she was a kid. “At the time, my father would walk me to school and there was this institute in the middle of the way where they kept disabled children. My father would always encourage me to save my pocket money, and with that money I would buy some biscuits, bananas and other things. Then, we would take the food to the institute and give it directly to the children, which was allowed back then. I was scared of those kids at first, but later I realised that they were just different and unique. After growing up a little, I started thinking about how to help people and make a difference.”

Inspired by her childhood experiences, Dabiri also organised workshops for children with Down syndrome, teaching them how to express themselves through art. According to her, the activities were marked by the participants’ enthusiasm as well as a joyful and collaborative environment. One year after the workshops took place, the artist drew 35 portraits of children with Down syndrome, later selling these works to a well-known Iranian hospital and investing the proceeds in education and medications for those children. Currently, she has been involved in talks with Unicef, with the goal of starting a new art project in the Netherlands, also being open to other possible partners.

In Dabiri’s view, volunteer work is a deeply transformative activity that has a great impact on people’s lives. “It has definitely changed me as a person; by doing volunteer work, I have become open-minded and caring, and now I care not only about people with disabilities, but also about everyone else who is around me.”

WUP 13/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

Wittenborg CEO Becomes Member of SER Topvrouwen

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg CEO Becomes Member of SER Topvrouwen

Wittenborg CEO Becomes Member of SER Topvrouwen

Maggie Feng Now Part of Organisation Aimed at Giving Visibility to Highly Qualified Women

Because Wittenborg sees diversity and inclusion as essential elements of social progress, the school has been involved in multiple initiatives that seek to promote these values. In line with this approach, Wittenborg CEO Maggie Feng recently joined SER Topvrouwen, an organisation that is part of the Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (SER) – an advisory body to the Dutch government that discusses and monitors social and economic policies.

Composed of women who occupy leadership positions in large Dutch institutions and corporations, SER Topvrouwen is aimed at giving visibility and helping accelerate the advancement of female talent. Among other contributions, the organisation has created a database of highly qualified women, open to professionals who have relevant work experience in business, public or semi-public organisations, active in management, directorship or executive positions. By accessing the platform, companies and institutions can search for female candidates with the right profiles for their open positions.

The initiative is connected to a legislative proposal approved in 2021 by the Dutch House of Representatives, which establishes quotas in order to improve gender diversity on corporate boards.

According to Feng, the actions implemented by SER Topvrouwen have produced positive results, with highly qualified female talent gaining visibility and companies becoming more diverse when compared to the pre-pandemic period. However, she stresses that there is still much work to be done towards gender equality. “Many organisations are starting to understand the value of diversity and inclusion, but they do not always manage to implement it. There are cases of women who started working in top positions and lost their jobs after one or two years because companies were not ready to push through change; sometimes it goes against their DNA. So, we have taken some steps, but there is still a long way to go until we really change society.”

 

Wittenborg CEO Becomes Member of SER Topvrouwen

Working Towards Inclusion

On 22 June, SER Topvrouwen organised a large event at the AFAS Theatre, in Leusden, with the title ‘SER Topvrouwen United 2022: Celebrate Diversity, Embrace Inclusion’. The programme included panels, lectures and other activities featuring prominent women who discussed their experiences in the field of inclusive leadership.

Having attended the event, Wittenborg’s CEO highlights that the prospects for female professionals are very positive, adding that young women need to be aware of their potential. “Students must know that being a woman is no longer seen as a disadvantage in the job market and, in many cases, it can be seen as an advantage. So, it is important to keep in mind that companies and organisations are ready to take female professionals on board, and this means great opportunities for women to develop into leaders if they have the right qualifications, even if they start in junior positions,” says Feng.

She also points out that Wittenborg has taken concrete actions to promote diversity, inclusion and gender equality, as well as to inspire younger generations. “One example is the Tech Women MBA Scholarship, which offers a 5,000-euro discount in tuition fees for female students. This means that we are putting our words into action, which is a great privilege because it sets Wittenborg apart from many organisations. Diversity is an essential part of us, and we are very proud of it.”

WUP 11/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press


Study Sheds Light on the Role of South African Women of Colour in Wine Industry

by Wittenborg News -

Study Sheds Light on the Role of South African Women of Colour in Wine Industry

Study Sheds Light on the Role of South African Women of Colour in Wine Industry

Wittenborg Graduate Ayabulela Noxonywa Says Sector Needs More Inclusion

“The winemaking industry has an immense impact on the local economy of Franschhoek Valley, and Franschhoek – known as the food and wine capital of South Africa – relies heavily on the hospitality sector, boasting award-winning restaurants, hotels and vineyards. Yet, the industry is not really inclusive for the women of colour who work in it,” stresses Ayabulela Noxonywa, who recently completed a BBA degree in Hotel & Hospitality Services Management at Witenborg’s Bad Voslau study location.

Having met a significant number of South African women of colour who work in vineyards, Noxonywa decided to write her graduation assignment on the roles of these women within the industry, as well as the barriers faced by them. According to the student, what sparked her interest was the perception that, every time she visits Franschhoek Valley’s vineyards, women of colour are responsible for wine tasting duties, while the winemaking tasks are predominantly performed by white men.

During her investigation, Noxonywa adopted a qualitative approach, having conducted in-depth interviews with two women of colour – one a soon-to-be qualified sommelier and another who recently graduated as an oenologist and viticulturist – as well as a white woman who works as a wine lecturer. The study finds that women in general are marginalised in the South African wine industry, a situation that is even more pronounced when it comes to women of colour.  

“Unfortunately, Franschhoek up until today does not have any women of colour working as winemakers. However, a major turn of events occurred nationwide when Carmen Stevens was the first woman of colour to be appointed as a qualified winemaker. Eventually, this sparked the formation of the first female-owned winery in South Africa.”

Noxonywa highlights that, although the South African government does offer training programmes intended to provide minorities with equal opportunities, women of colour who want to go into winemaking are faced with hindrances that include the lack of access to land. “A possible long-term way to address these inequalities could be to actively encourage women of colour to take the winemaking courses by offering incentives, such as making it easier for them to attain government land for winemaking purposes.”

Regarding her career goals, Noxonywa plans to get more experience in the tourism and hospitality sector, and eventually start her own business in the future. “I would love to gain more experience in Europe before going back home or starting my own entrepreneurial venture, especially because Europeans count for more than half of the international tourists that visit South Africa. I have considered working as a winemaker because my passion for hospitality began when I was doing the wine training and I was lucky to have my practical experience at an agricultural company in South Africa,” the graduate says.

WUP 8/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

MBM Thesis Examines Adoption of Smart Technologies by Sri Lankan Apparel Industry

by Wittenborg News -

MBM Thesis Examines Adoption of Smart Technologies by Sri Lankan Apparel Industry

MBM Thesis Examines Adoption of Smart Technologies by Sri Lankan Apparel Industry

Malmi Maddugoda’s Research Focused on Innovation and Sustainability

In line with her long-standing interest in sustainability, Sri Lankan student Malmi Maddugoda decided to write her master’s thesis on how the implementation of smart factories and sustainable manufacturing practices by the Sri Lankan apparel industry impact on economic sustainability. Maddugoda, who recently completed an MBM degree in Logistics & Trade, explains that the study is connected to research she had conducted during her bachelor’s studies, addressing sustainability in the Sri Lankan petroleum retail industry.

“I decided to do a continuation of that for my master’s, but focusing on a different industry. So, I picked the Sri Lankan apparel industry, which has a huge influence on the country’s economy. However, it is worth emphasising that smart factories are not yet popular in Sri Lanka, with the majority of the country’s manufacturing still being at Industry 2.0 level and labour intensive. Despite the overall situation, Sri Lankan apparel companies have proactively taken part in adopting smart factory technologies,” she says.

The student highlights that sustainable manufacturing encompasses economically sound manufacturing processes that consider environmental externalities. Economic sustainability, in turn, refers to the income’s ability to overweigh production costs for an extended period through different methodologies, such as resource efficiency, cost reduction, positive environment externalities and enabling social security, in order to ensure the future of an organisation or an economy.

To conduct her investigation, Maddugoda made use of quantitative methods, administering an online survey to 21 large and medium-scale apparel companies that adopt sustainable manufacturing practices. According to the study’s findings, the adoption of smart factory technologies by the Sri Lankan apparel industry is at an intermediary level, while the implementation of sustainable manufacturing practices is at an advanced level. However, despite the initiatives that have been conducted, the Sri Lankan apparel industry needs to strengthen its commitment to competing with the global apparel industry in the field of smart technologies.

“Special attention should be directed to medium-scale apparel companies in terms of promoting and making them aware of smart technologies. Nevertheless, the Sri Lankan apparel industry has overperformed when compared to the general trends of adoption of sustainable manufacturing practices. The implementation of these technologies may help the Sri Lankan apparel industry face the highly increasing competition from countries such as India, China and Bangladesh, among others, in the market of sustainable apparel products,” Maddugoda stresses.

After successfully graduating, the student plans to stay in the Netherlands for a while, with the goal of having a corporate experience in a highly developed European country. “Since my major is in Logistics & Trade, I am looking forward to securing a job in the Logistics and Supply Chain industry. Even though I worked for three years in this sector while in Sri Lanka, I plan to start the new job from entry level, hoping it will provide me with the ultimate international experience,” she says.

WUP 5/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press



Graduation Assignment Analyses Female Leadership in South Tyrol’s Hotel Industry

by Wittenborg News -
Graduation Assignment Analyses Female Leadership in South Tyrol’s Hotel Industry

HBA Student Anna Egger Highlights Emancipation of Women from the Region

Being originally from South Tyrol (Italy) and having worked in many hotels where women were in leadership positions, student Anna Egger felt intrigued by this situation. For this reason, she decided to write her graduation assignment on how South Tyrolean women lead the hospitality businesses they are part of. Egger recently completed an HBA degree in Hotel and Hospitality Services Management at Wittenborg's study location at the ITM college in Bad Voslau (Austria).

The student points out that, in general, women still face gender inequalities and do not have the same opportunities to rise to top management positions at the workplace as men. However, she stresses that a positive development can be seen in South Tyrol, where more than 10,000 women-owned businesses were registered at the end of 2020, almost 30% of them being active in the hotel industry.

“In South Tyrol, there is hardly a hotel that is managed without a woman, and female managers have a positive impact on the growth of the hotel industry. These women in leading positions have always inspired me through their passion, ambition and courage. Apart from wanting to learn more about this topic from a scientific point of view, I have set myself the goal to become a female hotel leader and to start my own business one day. So, the study was also intended to serve as a personal source of inspiration for my future career,” she says.

Among other objectives, Egger’s study was aimed at defining the leadership style and characteristics of female hotel leaders in South Tyrol, analysing the values, philosophy and visions of their hotel businesses, and investigating if these women had experienced any gender barriers during their careers. In order to collect data, the student interviewed eight female owners of hotels in the 4-to-5-star range.

According to the research, female leaders in the South Tyrolean hotel industry have a participative and employee-oriented leadership style, valuing flat hierarchy and humanity. “The data shows that they have strong soft skills, such as empathy and sensitivity. They can put themselves in the position of the employees and show interest in them through appreciation and praise. For this reason, these female leaders are also team-oriented, cooperative and loyal,” Egger says.

Moreover, the respondents were asked how their female leadership style and characteristics differ from the male leadership style. In their answers, they described males in leadership positions as more impulsive, tough and risk-taking, as well as colder, more distant and less detail-oriented than women. However, the respondents highlighted that men have specific qualities as leaders, such as being more direct and clear, promoting change by taking risks and embracing innovation, and being more persuasive and assertive.

Egger points out that, to her surprise, the study did not show any significant gender-specific barriers for women in the South Tyrolean hotel industry. “The results indicate that, in the South Tyrolean hotel industry, women are as respected as men. This testifies to the strong emancipation of women in the local hospitality sector, in what is a role model for other industries and countries. However, this conclusion must be viewed critically, because the respondents have a certain stability, since they are their own bosses and not employed hotel managers. Therefore, they can reconcile family and work with more ease than other females in leadership positions.”

Regarding her plans for the future, the student says that she would like to gain more experience in management, climb to higher positions and eventually run her own hotel. “In August, I will start working as an assistant executive manager at a hotel where I already worked as a receptionist. I am looking forward to taking on this new challenge, which will help me develop important leadership skills,” she says.

WUP 2/8/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

Summer Reading Recommendations

by Wittenborg News -

Summer Reading Recommendations

https://www.wittenborg.eu/summer-reading-recommendations.htm

Hanna Abdelwahab, Education Support Administrator, recommends 'The Lights in the Tunnel' by Martin Ford

The summer break has arrived, a time which many people like to use to really get stuck into a good book. But with so many choices out there, it can be hard to pick something. That is why, in this article, we will present you with some reading recommendations - both fiction and non-fiction - from Wittenborg staff members.

Hanna Abdelwahab, Education Support Administrator, recommends 'The Lights in the Tunnel' by Martin Ford

"In this book, Ford addresses three misconceptions held by conventional economists: (1) technological advancements will always lead to more prosperity and more jobs, (2) automation affects only low-paying or low-skilled jobs, and (3) machines cannot replace humanity. Ford says that technological advancements will cause mass unemployment, that knowledge jobs are also facing the threats of being automated and that robots don't have to be humans to replace humans. Despite the heavy subject, it's an easy read and very compelling."

Iryna Bernatska, Corporate Relations Manager, recommends 'The Last Empress' by Anchee Min

"What do you call it when an official's daughter from the poorest province becomes the ruler of China? I would call it a miracle. This historical fiction novel, which features a strong female lead, introduced me to a new world of beautiful stories, created by real people and written by masters of the pen."

Maike Nuyken, HR Manager, recommends 'Grilled - Turning Adversaries into Allies to Change the Chicken Industry' by Leah Garcés

"This is a book about creating change and making an impact against all odds. It illustrates how business can be a force for good and how we sometimes need to adjust our mindset to be able to make progress. It is also the story of a strong and inspiring female leader. A very inspirational and hopeful book. I would recommend it to anyone interested in activism, sustainability, or CSR."

Vanessa de Oliveira, Associate Professor of Applied Sciences, recommends 'The Silent Patient' by Alex Michaelides

"Alicia, a famous painter who was married to a fashion photographer, stopped talking and started treatment in a psychiatric clinic. Theo Faber, a criminal psychotherapist, uses his curiosity, know-how, and determination to understand what lead her to that point. What results is a psychological thriller that blurs the boundaries between victim and villain. I recommend this if you like a good thriller with surprise twists."

Marius Zürcher, Marketing & Communications Project Manager, recommends 'The Tanning of America: How Hip-Hop Created a Culture That Rewrote the Rules of the New Economy' by Steve Stoute

"Although ‘The Tanning of America’ is theoretically a business book, it can also change your perspective on the world at large. At its core, the book is about how hip-hop culture, with its focus on authenticity and aspiration, fundamentally shaped the Millennial generation, and about what the implications of that are, given that Millennials are now are the most influential generation in the world. It is therefore an essential read if you want to understand the present and the future a little more. For marketers, its core lesson is one that I too like to highlight continuously: authenticity is everything."

Adeyemi Banjo, Senior Lecturer, recommends 'Kane and Abel' by Jeffery Archer

"This novel, a relaxing yet exciting and engaging read, chronicles the lives of two men born under very different circumstances, on two different continents, who meet with explosive consequences. It’s a story about two very ambitious men, one born in the US and the other in Poland, how they navigate through life and marriage. It is about the challenges they face, and tough decisions they must make to survive, especially when their paths cross."

Myra Qiu, Process & Quality Manager, recommends the 'Remembrance of Earth's Past' series by Liu Cixin

"I highly recommend this amazing and deep sci-fi series, which covers things such as physics, astronomy, neurosciences, informatics, ecology, culture, military science, sociology, mathematics, psychology, and philosophy. The internal logic of the book is rigorous, and the author's encyclopaedic knowledge is impressive."

Ulisses Sawczuk, Copywriter & Journalist, recommends 'Meditations' by Marcus Aurelius

"This book contains a series of reflections on life that were written about 1,800 years ago by Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius. Apart from being an emperor, Marcus was trained in Stoic philosophy, and one of Stoicism’s main purposes is to provide people with the tools to develop their virtues and face the challenges posed by life. The book contains plenty of useful advice on how to approach problems and hardships, as well as discussions on human nature and how it connects to the universe. Moreover, it is a fascinating work that enables the reader to get a glimpse into the mind of a historical character and see that human beings always have to overcome the same kinds of obstacles, no matter what era they live in."

Thi Ngoc Tram La, Research Centre Intern, recommends 'I am Gifted, so Are You' by Adam Khoo

"This book is both practical, as it teaches you the study techniques of the author (himself a brilliant student in his time), and inspirational. I read it in high school, and I believe it turned me from a decent student into a great one. It changed my life."

Peter Birdsall, President, recommends 'The Boys in the Butterflies' by James Birdsall

"This book, written by my late uncle James Birdsall, reflects on his and his brothers' experiences as refugees in England during the Second World War, when they were evacuated to the countryside to escape the bombing by the Nazis. The story sowed the seeds of my lifelong passion of nature and especially butterflies and moths; however, the story is relevant again as Europe is once more plunged into war and a refugee crisis after the Russian invasion of Ukraine."

Aydan Ismayilova, EU Project Coordinator, recommends 'The Secret Lives of Color' by Kassia St. Clair

"This book, which tells the stories of 75 different colours, is an easy but nevertheless profound read. It will make you see colours from a totally new perspective. It will also provide you with plenty of new ice-breaking stories to tell."

WUP 30/7/2022
by Marius Zürcher
©WUAS Press

An Evening of Lively Conversation, Fun and Games

by Wittenborg News -

An Evening of Lively Conversation, Fun and Games

https://www.wittenborg.eu/evening-lively-conversation-fun-and-games.htm
An Evening of Lively Conversation, Fun and Games

Social Gathering Brings Together 25 Students at TonTon Club

The evening of 24 June was filled with fun, lively conversations and exciting games for 25 Wittenborg students who attended the social gathering organised by the school at TonTon Club in Amsterdam. Originally planned as a Summer Picnic, the event had to be moved to the café due to the rainy weather, and students were provided with free drinks by Wittenborg. Located in the heart of the Dutch capital, TonTon Club is famous for having a great variety of pinball machines and arcade games for all kinds of players.

Wittenborg’s Support Office & External Relations Coordinator Xiaoli Wu, who organised the activity, pointed out that the main goal of the event was to give students the opportunity to socialise outside school and have some quality time together. “Although the picnic ended up becoming another event, everyone enjoyed it a lot and it definitely fulfilled our expectations. It was a pleasant evening in which students met and talked about their lives, hobbies and holiday plans, and also played games to release the pressure after their exams.”

For student organiser Isaac Pattison, who is pursuing an EBA degree, playing games with other people is a fun way to make new friends. “We had a lot of fun and it was great meeting new people and learning more about their cultures, as well as playing games with them. I really enjoyed playing this car racing game, it was definitely my favourite.”

An Evening of Lively Conversation, Fun and Games

According to associate professor Dadi Chen, the event gave participants the chance to have interesting and insightful conversations. “One of my students talked to me about her homesickness and I told her and other students some of the experiences I had when I came to the Netherlands for the first time. Interactions like this are always enriching for everyone,” he said.

MBA student Amal Orm said that she had an amazing time at the gathering, adding that activities of this type make students feel like they are actively involved in the Wittenborg community. “For me, the games were the most enjoyable part, and I had a lot of fun when playing a dancing game with my friends, because I like dancing a lot. These are the kind of memories that you will keep with you forever,” she stressed.

WUP 28/7/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press


Student Investigates Impact of Pandemic on Generation Z’s Consumer Behaviour

by Wittenborg News -

Student Investigates Impact of Pandemic on Generation Z’s Consumer Behaviour

Student Investigates Impact of Pandemic on Generation Z’s Consumer Behaviour

Kristina Iatsenko’s Graduation Assignment Analyses Changes in Consumption of Food and Beverage

After the COVID-19 restrictive measures were lifted, Wittenborg student Kristina Iatsenko noticed that her consumer behaviour regarding food and beverages had changed significantly in comparison with the pre-pandemic period. Among other new habits, Iatsenko stresses that instead of going to restaurants with friends, she now prefers ordering food and having dinner at home, while trips to the grocery store have been replaced by online orders that include home delivery. Moreover, she points out that she has started cooking much more often, trying out new recipes and considering it a hobby.  

Curious to know the extent to which these changes had affected generation Z (born between 1995 and 2010), Iatsenko, who has recently completed an IBA degree in Hospitality Management, decided to address this topic in her graduation assignment. “After discussing this phenomenon with my friends, I realised that this could be a trend of our generation. When planning my research, I thought it would be interesting to focus on international students, since they differ from each other in terms of culture, mentality, traditions and worldview. So, by having diverse backgrounds and at the same time living in a common environment, young people could have been hit by the pandemic differently,” she says.

In order to conduct the investigation, the student used quantitative methods, having administered an online survey to 296 Apeldoorn-based Wittenborg students who are members of generation Z. According to the study’s findings, as a result of the pandemic, Gen Z-ers have adopted new consumer habits and preferences concerning food and beverages. These changes include ordering food from cafés and restaurants more frequently, choosing online grocery delivery services, cooking their own food, opting for a healthier diet, increasing the consumption of vegetables and fruits and minimising the consumption of sugar and fast food.

“Some of these aspects are common trends of the generation, while others are individual in nature and can be studied in more detail. Considering that these consumer habits have remained even after the restrictions were lifted, we can talk about the long-term nature of these changes; therefore, we need to be prepared for the fact that humanity is demanding new types of services within the food and beverage industry,” Iatsenko highlights.

Asked about her plans for the future, the graduate says she is focused on building a career in the hospitality industry, and mentions that she is currently working as a night auditor at a hotel from the Radisson group. “This is a position that involves supervising tasks and responsibility. Therefore, I am planning to dedicate my ‘zoekjaar’ (orientation year) to becoming more experienced as a supervisor, and later I would like to work as a junior manager at a hotel in the Netherlands.”

WUP 26/7/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

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