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To Work or Not to Work During your Studies?

by Wittenborg News -

To Work or Not to Work During your Studies?

What are the Pros and Cons of Working as a Student?

https://www.wittenborg.eu/work-or-not-work-during-your-studies.htm

To work or not to work while you study? That’s the big question most university students ask themselves. In the Netherlands, students from outside the EU/EEA are allowed to work 16 hours a week alongside their studies. Making a decision on this is quite challenging as there are many pros and cons to both sides of the coin. Wittenborg MBA student Hanna Abdelwahab made a cost-benefit analysis.

Benefits of Working Part-Time

  • Finance: First and foremost, working part-time can help you cover your cost of living more comfortably, and for some, help you to stay above water. More and more students are now working part-time to help them pay their tuition fees, accommodation, transport, food and a little extra for leisure or sports.
  • Independence: Working part-time teaches you independence and how to manage and budget your money. If before, your parents handed out money to you and paid everything for you, now it’s more likely that you have to learn to budget your money to ensure that you don’t miss your rent payment or your tuition fees. You may have to tighten your belt a little bit, but all is good if you know how not to overspend your money.
  • Time Management: Working part-time teaches you how to manage your time well. You will realise that you have less time now for play or doing unproductive activities. You will learn how to become more organised and utilise whatever little time you have for tasks that you need to complete.
  • Future Career: Part-time work can be a great stepping stone to a brighter career in your area of interest.  This experience will add credit to your portfolio and you definitely can showcase your job experience with your future employer after you graduate.
  • Soft and hard skills: Taking a part-time job related to your field of study can also provide you with the hard and soft skills required. Hard skills refer to skills like handling machines, or writing computer software, or preparing a dish. Soft skills refer to managing customer requests, negotiating skills, teamwork, initiative, leadership and creativity. These skills are pertinent to enabling you to land the job that you aspire to after graduation.

Where Things can Go Wrong Working Part-Time

  • Skipping Classes: Well, for one thing, the draw to make money is more attractive to most students than their studies. So many students don’t hesitate to skip lessons just to make that extra buck to fill their pockets. Students often absent themselves from classes or leave early or come late. This is definitely not wise, as they will miss a lot if they miss even one class or lecture. Such irresponsible acts can lead to low marks or even a fail in examinations.
  • Lethargy: Exhaustion is another issue that students have to reckon with if they work part-time. When they get home after work, they often feel too tired and dispirited to study or do their assignments. One day’s postponement or procrastination will cause students’ writing and reading assignments to pile up. And if this continues for many weeks, students will then come to the realisation that they cannot catch up any longer. It is indeed difficult to be disciplined if students work part-time, mostly due to the fact that they will be mentally and physically tired.
  • Concentration: Working part-time can also add to your anxiety and challenges in life, especially if you have a difficult employer or team players. Sometimes, problems at work affect students in class or at home, thus causing difficulties of concentration. Persistent anxieties and worries can also affect students psychologically and mentally.
  • When we compare the pros and cons of working part-time, it seems that the cons are more serious than the benefits. How can we reconcile the two?
  • Students must realise that studies always come first - that’s basically their aim, especially for international students, for coming to the Netherlands - to get a degree or master’s degree. So, in whatever they choose to do, their performance in their studies should be their topmost priority. A survey done by a group of students in their Business Statistics class in Block 2 revealed that many students who work part-time had performed badly in their examinations and had to retake many of their subjects.

So, what is the advice here? If you have performed badly in class because you have been working part-time, do take time to reconsider which is more important for you - studies or work? There is definitely no point in working if you’re going to fail multiple times in your exams. If you really need to work due to financial reasons, ensure that you make arrangements with your employer so that you don’t miss any classes, and that you take extra time off a week or two before your exams to concentrate on your revision. Another solution would be to opt for a full-summer job when you don’t have any classes or assignments.

The keyword here is honesty. Ask yourself - can you really cover that shift or job and complete your assignments or attend your classes regularly? Do you have enough time to revise before the examination? Do you really need the money to cover your basic expenses, or do you need the extra cash to satisfy your wants rather than your needs? Ponder these questions well. The answer is within you.

WUP 10/12/2019
by Hanna Adelwahab
©Wittenborg University Press

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Expert on Migrant Entrepreneurship Shares Insight at Wittenborg Amsterdam

by Wittenborg News -

Managers of Amsterdam City Part of Discussion at Wittenborg Amsterdam on Supporting Migrant Entrepreneurship

Managers of Amsterdam City Part of Discussion at Wittenborg Amsterdam on Supporting Migrant Entrepreneurship

A European expert on migrant entrepreneurs, Dr Issac Acheampong, recently gave a guest seminar to undergraduate and MBA students at Wittenborg Amsterdam. Acheampong is the Program Manager of the European Regional Development Funds Program (ERDF) at the Amsterdam City Council. He has more than 20 years' experience working with migrant entrepreneurs in areas that have been targeted by the EU for urban renewal. The seminar was for the course Entrepreneurial Behaviour in Amsterdam Zuidoost.

 

Managers of Amsterdam City Part of Discussion at Wittenborg Amsterdam on Supporting Migrant Entrepreneurship

Using migrant start-ups in Amsterdam Zuidoost as a case study, Dr. Acheampong led the students through a thoughtful discussion about the motives, inventiveness and behaviours of migrant entrepreneurs. During the seminar, students were able to ask about various interventions and initiatives the local government has taken to facilitate the growth of entrepreneurship.

Dr. Acheampong introduced the students to the “Strategic Framework Growth Model", which is the underlying model for initiating and implementing successful entrepreneurial projects in the area. Not only did the audience include EBA & MBA students, but a few city managers were also on hand to take part in the discussion on how the city can best stimulate and support ethnic entrepreneurship.   

 

Managers of Amsterdam City Part of Discussion at Wittenborg Amsterdam on Supporting Migrant Entrepreneurship

Regarding his experience, Dr. Acheampong said, "It was a pleasure to engage with a multicultural, bright and talented group of Bachelor and MBA students, and I was impressed by their keen interest in starting up their own business. The entire experience was highly memorable and productive, and I strongly look forward to the next engagement."

WUP 8/12/2019
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press


Managing Stress as a Student

by Wittenborg News -

Managing Stress as a Student

Recent Study Revealed 75% of Students in the Netherlands are "Emotionally Exhausted"

https://www.wittenborg.eu/managing-stress-student.htm

Everyone gets stressed out from time to time, but the question is, how to manage it? A study done by the Dutch Student Union revealed almost three quarters of students in the Netherlands are "emotionally exhausted", while 1 in 4 has a higher risk of burnout. MBA student Hanna Abdelwahab has some tips for identifying and managing stress.  

"Stress is a feeling of mental tension or pressure caused by various things in life like excessive workload, problems with family or friends, a transitional period, financial troubles or health issues.  Stress has a cumulative effect, which means that one stressor can build on top of another.  A person who is under stress often shows various physical symptoms.  This is something normal, and it is a reaction by the body to try and eliminate it from the system.   

Stress has to be managed, as it can affect your health and wellbeing, and even your life.  Different people afflicted by stress may show different signs and symptoms.  Symptoms can vary from physical, behavioural, emotional to mental. Some basic symptoms are feelings of anxiety or unduly worried, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, being easily angered, low self-esteem, insomnia, use of alcohol, or over or under-eating.   

Sometimes stress results in health issues such as headaches, muscle tension, diarrhoea or constipation, dizziness and high blood pressure.  Different people are affected by stress differently and this list is not exhaustive.  If you feel you are stressed out, always consult your doctor, even if you don’t see any of the symptoms above.

Normal stress is okay.  In fact, mild stress is good, as it keeps us on our toes and pushes us to persevere and do our best in whatever we do.  But if you experience a prolonged symptom or symptoms, consult a doctor or talk to someone.  Identifying your symptoms early is always better than ignoring it, as it can build up and become more serious and critical.

If you do feel stressed out due to whatever reason, there are ways to combat it.  First identify what triggers your stress and anxiety.  Once you have identified it, try to address it as best as you can.  Always maintain a positive attitude by pushing out all negative thoughts that try to invade your mind.  Believe that things, no matter how bad they are, will always work out well in the end.  Time and patience will tell.  Always remember that there is only so much you can control and change.  Be reasonable and always try your best.  Don’t give up or punish yourself if things don’t turn out as you wish.  Sometimes, what you think is an affliction is actually a blessing in disguise.

If you cannot change things as you hope to, take time out and relax.  Get some sleep, be involved in interesting activities or get away for some time.  Don’t be so hard on yourself, and tell yourself that everything will be okay.  Maintain a healthy lifestyle with healthy food and exercise.  Meet up with family and friends and avoid alcohol or undesirable habits like smoking or binge eating.   

Stress is just like any other sickness.  And sickness takes time to heal and recover from.  So, don’t panic if your symptoms linger on.  Always be calm and take one day at a time.  Don’t worry over things too much.  Do remember one thing: that you are not alone.  Every human being is afflicted with stress one way or another in their lives.

WUP 6/12/2019

by Hanna Abdelwahab
©Wittenborg University Press

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Head of Research Attends Conference at Eton College in UK

by Wittenborg News -

Head of Research Attends Conference at Eton College in UK

Character Education Part of Wittenborg Curriculum as Key Value

https://www.wittenborg.eu/head-research-attends-conference-eton-college-uk.htm

Wittenborg's Head of Research, Dr Nicolet Theunissen, recently attended an inspiring conference on character education - which is about instilling values like respect, justice and good citizenship in students. The conference took place at Eton College in England, (in)famous for educating the British elite, including 19 UK ministers as well as royals like Prince William and Prince Harry.

Theunissen said the theme of the conference - entitled "Character Education: theories, practices, processes" - tied in well the ethics taught in all Wittenborg classes as key values. The conference was organised by Eton's Tony Little Center in cooperation with BrainCanDo.

"My aim was to gain inspiration about character development for both Wittenborg and my MooierMens.app (BetterYourself.app) - a platform which helps people develop more positive behaviour." She described the conference as "a fascinating experience with room for both knowledge and networking".

"Several speakers at the conference emphasised that character education should not be a separate school subject, but should be woven through all teaching. Some call this 'split-screen teaching' some call it 'double helix', in which content and character are taught simultaneously. This fits the way Wittenborg embraces ethics as a key value in all classes."

Theunissen said she was particularly inspired by the presentation of Professor Patricia Riddell entitled "Is Learning Catching? Contagion in the Classroom". "She brought the role of the human mirror neurons to our attention. This is the part in our brain that help us to mirror behaviour of fellow human beings.

"Riddell explained that these mirror neurons cause the contagion of someone else's emotions or attitude. We all know that the enthusiastic, motivated teacher also enthuses the student. But it also works the other way around. So, if you as a student want to have enthusiastic teachers, show some enthusiasm yourself!

"I also enjoyed the presentations of Dr Kathy Weston about how to improve resilience in children by engaging the parents too, and that of Dominic Randolph about how we can help students to journey with purpose and live flourishing lives. Finally, I bought a book called 'Character Toolkit for Teachers' authored by Frederika Roberts and Elizabeth Wright, which I enjoyed reading during my train (not plane) trip back to Apeldoorn."

WUP 4/12/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press


Last Student Intake for 2019

by Wittenborg News -

 

Last Student Intake for 2019

New Students from 16 Different Countries

Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences welcomed almost 40 new students this week - its last intake for 2019, with the youngest among them a 17-year old from Ukraine, and also featuring a member of Turkey's national showjumping team.

The group represents 16 different nationalities: Russia, Rwanda, Nigeria, India, China, Vietnam, Cameroon, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Nepal, Iran, Ukraine, Pakistan, Uganda, Ghana and Indonesia. The majority of students will study at Wittenborg's main campus in Apeldoorn, while about 15%, doing entrepreneurship studies on both Master and Bachelor level, will join Wittenborg Amsterdam.

Last Student Intake for 2019

They start classes on Monday, but participated in several orientation activities during Introduction Week.  On Thursday, the group had an informal lunch with members of staff and fellow students.

The group was welcomed by Wittenborg CEO, Maggie Feng, who jokingly told the international students: "Sorry for the Dutch weather!" She encouraged them to utilise their time in the Netherlands to the full and make as many connections as possible to widen their networks.

Last Student Intake for 2019

One of the new admissions is Keji Karenm from Nigeria, who will do an IBA (Bachelor) in Economics & Management. She said she chose to study in the Netherlands because the cost of study and the cost of living is more affordable than some other countries. "Many Dutch people speak English, at Wittenborg the entry dates are very flexible, so all-in-all I've had a good impression of the Netherlands so far."

Last Student Intake for 2019

Sri Lankan student Sarani Wijesundara will do a Master in Business Management (MBM) at Wittenborg. She loves the fact that there are so many different nationalities studying at Wittenborg - close to 100!

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Sadness at Farewell of Student Registrar, Santosh Aryal

by Wittenborg News -
Sadness at Farewell of Student Registrar, Santosh Aryal

Under Santosh Aryal Student Registrations at Wittenborg Rose to Almost 1,000 by 2019

https://www.wittenborg.eu/sadness-farewell-student-registrar-santosh-aryal.htm

There was a tinge of sadness in the air as staff and students bid farewell to outgoing student registrar Santosh Aryal, who is leaving Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences after 13 years to pursue new challenges in Belgium and eventually the UK. Under Aryal, Wittenborg's student registrations have risen to almost 1,000 in 2019 after starting in Apeldoorn in 2010 at around 175.

Thursday morning staff surprised him with a little cake party before an after-work gathering later in the day at Brasserie Intermezzo in Apeldoorn. There will be a formal farewell at Wittenborg's annual staff dinner on 10 January, 2020.

Sadness at Farewell of Student Registrar, Santosh Aryal

Aryal, with his trademark ease, recalled his first days as a student at Wittenborg. "I learned different things from different colleagues, but also from students. Maggie (Feng, CEO), for instance, told me that I can make 100 mistakes, but not to repeat mistakes. I will take everything I learned and put it into my new business, my new adventure. So thank you Wittenborg for giving me the platform to work and become this person who I am today."

Dutch native, Florian Oosterberg, will replace Aryal as Student Registrar. She joined Wittenborg in 2014 as an admissions officer, rising steadily through the ranks and completing a master's degree in Chinese Studies in 2017 at Leiden University.

The announcement had already been made by Wittenborg's Executive Board in September. The chair of the board, Peter Birdsall, said: "We sincerely wish Santosh the very best of luck in his future career. He has been at the heart of Wittenborg’s development over the past 10 years, moving to Apeldoorn in 2010 with 175 student registrations, compared with the almost 1,000 registrations in 2019."

WUP 30/11/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Sadness at Farewell of Student Registrar, Santosh Aryal
Sadness at Farewell of Student Registrar, Santosh Aryal
Sadness at Farewell of Student Registrar, Santosh Aryal
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Students get Masterclass in Influencing Consumer Choices

by Wittenborg News -

Students get Masterclass in Influencing Consumer Choices

Workshop on Beverage Marketing Explores the Art of Influencing Consumers' Choices

https://www.wittenborg.eu/students-get-masterclass-influencing-consumer-choices.htm

Hospitality students at Wittenborg recently spent a fun day exploring how the packaging and branding of beverages influence consumers' choices as well as the importance of sense in the tasting experience. This, of course, meant tasting and discussing both soft and alcoholic drinks from around the world.

Students get Masterclass in Influencing Consumer Choices

The workshop was supervised by Wittenborg lecturer Trinidad Navarro, who teaches the module Beverage Marketing to Hospitality Management (HBA) double-degree students. The latter acted as hosts to MSc Hospitality Management students that got to do the tasting. Both groups shared their experiences afterwards.

Navarro said the learning objective of the workshop was to evaluate how senses influence the taste experience and analyse the packaging, branding and possible marketing strategies of the drinks. The workshop was held in Aventus' Hotel School in Apeldoorn.

Students get Masterclass in Influencing Consumer Choices

One of the HBA students who participated, Kyle Holtzhausen, said it was fascinating to learn how presentation and environment play a role in people's choices. "For instance, we poured expensive drinks in ordinary paper cups and cheap drinks in beautiful glasses, and people actually preferred the latter just because of the way it was presented. We also made an effort to engage everybody's senses by, for instance, blindfolding them while tasting certain drinks, or having them wear earphones and playing music. All of this influenced their perception of a certain drink."

WUP 28/11/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

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Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism

by Wittenborg News -

Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism

Why Internationalism is Important

https://www.wittenborg.eu/apeldoorn-students-visit-wittenborg-learn-about-internationalism.htm

Recently, Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences hosted approximately 110 students from the Christelijk Lyceum Apeldoorn, whose purpose it was to learn about internationalism. And where better than at Wittenborg, which currently boasts almost 100 different nationalities in terms of its student population?

Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism

One of the highlights was a presentation from Wittenborg MBA student and Australian educationalist Linda Harwood, who explained that internationalism means political, economical, and cultural cooperation between nations. She also emphasised why it is important for students to care about internationalism. "It is easy to get caught up in your own everyday routine with the assumption that your thoughts and actions do not have an effect on others. We are all affected by other countries and cultures."

Harwood then drew attention to the different customs and ways of doing business in different societies, citing traditions from Asia vs those of Western countries. Harwood also made the session interactive by asking questions during the presentation, and rewarding students who answered correctly with a souvenir from Australia.

Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism

After her session, the students were divided into 10 groups to work on a presentation. Wittenborg's Communication and Events Coordinator, Nadia Zaman, said: "For this session, we had 10 of our Wittenborg student volunteers from 10 different countries to lead the groups to create a flipchart presentation about their own country. The countries were Austria, Bangladesh, Georgia, India, Iran, Italy, Malaysia, Russia, Spain & Sri Lanka. Each group then had 5 minutes to present their country to the other groups without mentioning the country itself."

WUP 27/11/2019
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press


Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism
Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism
Apeldoorn Students Visit Wittenborg to Learn about Internationalism


Whiskey Burn at Dublin WhiskeyLive

by Wittenborg News -

Whiskey Burn at Dublin WhiskeyLive

Whiskey Burn at Dublin WhiskeyLive '19 - and the 'Mystery Whiskeys' Revealed

https://www.wittenborg.eu/whiskey-burn-dublin-whiskeylive.htm

Last year, Wittenborg University Press book Whiskey Burn - the Distilleries of Ireland by Vespa was launched at Whiskey Live in Dublin Castle, Ireland. They sold out of books at that event, and this year the book’s author, Ben Birdsall, returned with Wittenborg's Chair of the Board, Peter Birdsall, with their own stand to test the market.

Whiskey Burn at Dublin WhiskeyLive

The Whisky Burn books are Ben's study of the state of the whisky distilling industry by journeying around on his classic Vespa 50. With every copy sold of either Whiskey Burn or the first volume, Whisky Burn (about the Scottish distilleries), free samples of ‘Mystery Dram A’ and/or ‘Mystery Dram B’ were offered on the night.

Ben was delighted with the reception of his book again. “Dublin WhiskeyLive is without doubt the biggest Irish whiskey event of the year,” he said. “It was great to meet up again with some of the characters who actually appear in the book, like Eric from Midleton, who hosted the tastings that night on Cape Clear Island in Chapter 2, chief distiller Ned from Waterford distillery, Peter Mulryan, who had gone home and closed by the time I got to his Blackwater distillery, legendary distiller Noel Sweeney of Powerscourt, and John Teeling, ‘father’ of the Irish whiskey renaissance.

Whiskey Burn at Dublin WhiskeyLive

“But besides socialising and networking, WhiskeyLive is also a marketing event, and some of the most special and latest offerings from the Irish distillers were on offer. I was able to talk to the people who bought my books and they told me about their own experiences of the whiskey trail, and I spoke to people who had bought books in the past with valuable feedback. Tina, from Germany, even came with her own copy she had bought online to get me to sign it!”

Press and bloggers were there; Ben was interviewed by Youtube vlogger WhiskyJason for his channel, and Serghios Florides, editor of Irish Whiskey Magazine, confirmed the entry of his article on how Irish Whiskey is viewed from Switzerland, to be published in the next edition. And, of course, they managed to sell quite a few copies, and so poured plenty of mystery drams.

The event had been sold out for weeks, and the exhibitor stands for months. Organisers, Celtic Whiskey Shop, found themselves turning distilleries away. Next year, WhiskeyLive is going to move to a larger venue, and Whisky Burn plans to be there.

And the identities of the mystery whiskeys?
Follow this link to the article on Ben’s website to find out (and order your own copy for Xmas ...):Whiskey Burn at Dublin WhiskeyLive19 - and the 'Mystery Whiskeys' Revealed

WUP 25/11/2019
by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press

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Warehouse Expert Happy to Share Knowledge with Amsterdam Students

by Wittenborg News -

Warehouse Expert Happy to Share Knowledge with Amsterdam Students

Amsterdam Guest Lecturer Worked with Some of World's Biggest Logistics Companies

https://www.wittenborg.eu/warehouse-expert-happy-share-knowledge-amsterdam-students.htm

Dutch warehouse expert, Emiel van Gijzen, shared his tricks of the trade with entrepreneurial students from Wittenborg Amsterdam during a recent Procurement and Production seminar in the capital city. Van Gijzen has worked for big logistics companies like DHL, XPO and Panalpina, and has 25 years' experience in warehouse management. 

During the seminar he looked at questions like: What does the warehouse mean to an entrepreneur? Costs and risks in storage and transportation? Efficiency of cash flow and product delivery?

Students appreciated having a professional from the field sharing the inside scoop of his job.  

Though some of them have visited warehouses before, the seminar raised their interest in the functions of warehouses in the general management of enterprises, especially in the Netherlands where they can enjoy scrapping customs tariffs in import and export.

Van Gijzen also guided students in exploring the reasons behind choosing the location of a warehouse and the importance of warehouses in logistics systems. He furthermore emphasised the costs of warehouses. Entrepreneurs and business management need to create a bridge between internal and external parties' involvement, due to their sometimes differing responsibilities.  

Van Gijzen has worked for logistics service providers as well as consultants and retail and industrial companies in the Netherlands and abroad. In this environment, he is actively involved in warehouse design, implementation and optimisation for many companies.

He found it inspiring to share his vast knowledge with international students.  “It’s a good experience for me, too. I’m quite inspired by the interaction with the international students. I hope my seminar will benefit them in the same way.”

WUP 24/11/2019
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press


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