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Women In Tech® Netherlands Event at Wittenborg Amsterdam Recognises Iranian Talent

by Wittenborg News -

Women In Tech® Netherlands Event at Wittenborg Amsterdam Recognises Iranian Talent

Women In Tech® Netherlands Event at Wittenborg Amsterdam Recognises Iranian Talent

Empowerment Through Education

On, Monday 19 September, Wittenborg's Amsterdam campus was proud to host part of day-one of the Women In Tech® Europe Awards 2022. At the celebration, Wittenborg staff and students in Amsterdam got the chance to connect with inspirational professional women. This included Ayumi Moore Aoki, founder and CEO of Women In Tech® Global, and President of Women In Tech® Netherlands, Dr Cara Antoine.

The occasion was particularly special for Wittenborg, which offers the Tech Women MBA Scholarship in partnership with Women in Tech® Netherlands. The Tech Women MBA Scholarship seeks to increase the representation of women in top positions. Currently within the EU, women are underrepresented in ICT as well as managerial or leadership positions, tending to learn less income annually than men in similar roles. Via the Tech Women Scholarship programme, Wittenborg incentivises women to enter the fields of Data Analytics and Digital Transformation, bridging the gender gap in these areas.

Women In Tech® Netherlands Event at Wittenborg Amsterdam Recognises Iranian Talent

Recognising Iranian Talent

During the Women In Tech® Europe Awards 2022, Wittenborg was honoured to hand out this scholarship to three academics, each of them Iranian women. While two of the scholarship awardees were present, a third could not attend. Nevertheless, she was part of a new wave of women's empowerment at Wittenborg. The Tech Women MBA Scholarship that these intelligent women received will endow them with the know-how to create a name for themselves – as well as a significant change – within the professional world at large.

Wittenborg looks forward to seeing how these women take advantage of their education and wishes them success in their endeavours.

Women In Tech® Netherlands Event at Wittenborg Amsterdam Recognises Iranian Talent

Learning from the Best

Throughout the event, those present got to mingle with Aoki and Antoine, and other inspiring businesswomen who spoke with attendees about their personal journeys. Aoki and Antoine also gave advice to the established as well as budding professional women in attendance. Following the event, Antoine highlighted the diversity and inclusion efforts of Wittenborg's own CEO – and fellow member of SER Topvrouwen – Maggie Feng via social media.

Wittenborg looks forward to seeing its partnership with Women in Tech® flourish, ushering in a new wave of competent, educated women professionals from across the globe. Together, we will make a real difference in the lives of girls and women who may not otherwise get the opportunities and guidance they need to find success in their careers. Wittenborg also thanks Ayumi Moore Aoki and Dr Cara Antoine for their support and good will. We hope to meet again in the future to exchange more insights and support between women professionals and those entering the fields of technology and business.

WUP 26/09/2022
by Olivia Nelson
©WUAS Press


Erasmus+ Eco-OSS Project’s Third Transnational Partner Meeting

by Wittenborg News -

Erasmus+ Eco-OSS Project’s Third Transnational Partner Meeting

Erasmus+ Eco-OSS Project’s Third Transnational Partner Meeting

Project Partners Enthusiastic About Successful Project Completion

The Third Transnational Partner Meeting of the Erasmus+ Eco-systems of Open Science Schooling Project (“Eco-OSS Project”), which is led and coordinated by Wittenborg, took place virtually on 29th August 2022. This was the final occasion for the Knowledge Partners, Wittenborg and University of Eastern Finland, and the Practice Partner schools from Lithuania (Pasvalio Levens Primary School), Poland (Liceum Ogólnokształcące z Oddziałami Dwujęzycznymi im. Adama Mickiewicza), Turkey (ITU ETA Foundation College) and Romania (Gheorghe Titeica School), to come together to discuss the final project-related works to be carried out in September ahead of the project completion at the end of September. The agenda for this meeting consisted of discussion regarding the finalisation of the Intellectual Outputs (“the IOs”); preparation of the Multiplier Events; financial administration, and the progress of the final report.

Intellectual Outputs

The main aim of the Eco-OSS Project, which started in October 2020, is to help secondary schools and science teachers change traditional science teaching into science learning through science missions in collaboration with permanent eco-systems of open science schooling resources. This approach is expected to engage students in brand new ways and to help them create new and different images of what science is and could be for them. There are four IOs, which will be disseminated as outcomes from the Eco-OSS Project, namely a Guidance Pack (IO1), a Student Video (IO2), a Policy Paper (IO3), and a Research Paper (IO4).

During the meeting, the first draft of IO1, the Guidance Pack, was viewed and discussed by the partners. This innovative guidance document is designed to act as a tool to assist schools with implementing open science schooling in their respective schools and wider communities. It includes details on the project consortium, an introduction to the eco-system and its benefits to the schools and wider communities. It also details the step-by-step guide on how to build the eco-system, including how to connect and engage with potential partners. Some examples of eco-system partners and perspectives from students, teachers, and partners were also given as well as some illustrations of the skills and knowledge acquired by the students through their science mission activities.

Overall, there was a positive response and some helpful suggestions from the partners on the content and presentation of the Guidance Pack. It was also confirmed that a YouTube channel is in the process of being created where all the videos that the students have created throughout their school missions will be available for viewing, and a link to this channel will be available in the Guidance Pack as support material. The Guidance Pack will be published on the project website.

Malavika Jaikumar from the University of Eastern Finland shared the project’s IO2, the Student Video. The Student Video consists of eighteen minutes of footage from interviews with students from the four Practice Partner schools, encapsulating the students’ learning experience of completing their science missions within their respective schools and communities. Jaikumar commented that by creating the Student Video, “the hope was to capture each country’s essence in the manner it was supposed to showcase” and that while conducting the interviews “the students have been quite interested in talking about everything.” The feedback on the Student Video was very positive, with partners commenting that it was a wonderful, authentic, sincere, and exciting presentation, with Team Romania highlighting that the Erasmus spirit for excellence in education in Europe was evident throughout the production. Team Turkey also noted the positive aspect of students not only talking about science but also the world around them, communicating with each other and having human-to-human contact. The video has been uploaded to YouTube and can be accessed

.

Project Quality Assurance partner, Mireia Masgrau, of Working with Europe/Treballant amb Europa Associació, updated the partners on the progress of the IO3, the Policy Paper. The paper entitled “What (More) Does it Take to Make Open Science Schooling a Reality?” will introduce and set out the framework for the project and will present the schools and students as drivers of change and innovation in the community. It will also highlight the science resources in the community as well as the science missions in schools as re-engaging the students interest in science.

IO4 is the Research Paper which is being prepared by Wittenborg staff, Dadi Chen and Hanna Abdelwahab. The focus of the research is to highlight the challenges of OSS, such as knowledge and guidance shortages that prevent schools and science teachers from undertaking OSS. Once finalised, the paper will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. 

Grand Finale of Eco-OSS Project: The Multiplier Events

The grand finale of the Eco-OSS project is the Multiplier Event, which has to be carried out by each partner in their respective countries. The aim of this event is to increase the awareness of the project in general and most importantly to share the project progression by promoting and disseminating the resulting Intellectual Outputs of the project to a wider audience. The Multiplier Events will take place throughout September in the respective countries; in Poland on 15 September hosted by Liceum Ogólnokształcące z Oddziałami Dwujęzycznymi im, Adama Mickiewicza, in Finland on 23 September hosted by the University of Eastern Finland, and in the Netherlands on 26 September hosted by Wittenborg. This latter event will take place in NewTechPark, Apeldoorn, where local educators in the scientific field and local schools have been invited to hear about the works of our Practice Partner schools and where attendees can participate in a workshop to learn how the region can benefit from a similar project and how they can integrate the Eco-OSS project results into their respective industries and school curricula. To register to attend this event, if you are a Wittenborg student, please use this form; if you are an external guest, please use this form.

The target audience for the Eco-OSS Multiplier Events is broad, ranging from mission partners, science teachers, students, management representatives, local authorities, civil associations and groups. The agenda for the Multiplier Event consists of introducing the eco-systems through one of the science collaborators; science teachers presenting the Guidance Pack and how it can be used; the student teams presenting their video and explaining how they made it and what it means to them; reactions from the audience on how they see the open schooling initiative and how they think this form of science engagement can be used in the community; and finally open mobilisation – determining who would like to support and engage the eco-system of open science schooling and agreeing on a workshop for interested players after the multiplier event. The student teams will also follow up the interest and introduce new resources to the eco-system. Each partner is free to adapt the agenda and design their respective multiplier event in the most suitable way for their particular purposes and all of the partners attending the virtual meeting were very enthusiastic about their planning, preparing and delivering their upcoming Multiplier Events.

Reflections on Erasmus+ Project

Reflecting on the project progress, Livia Popescu, from Romania, commented that the project created “an ecosystem of friendship” between all the partners and that it was “really different from any other European project” in this regard. Mustafa Aydın, from Turkey, also echoed this sentiment of mutual collaboration and shared an anecdote about winning the hearts of and attracting prospective students and their parents due to the availability of Erasmus+ projects and activities within their school. All partners aspired to participating in many more projects together in the future and it was emphasised that the Practice Partner schools have now gained valuable project experience as a result of participating in this project and are now prepared to write project applications and proposals in their own right.

More information about the progress of the project and the individual schools’ activities can be found at the Eco-OSS Open Science Schooling website.

WUP 24/9/2022
by Selina White and Hanna Abdelwahab, with contributions from partner schools.
©WUAS Press


Wittenborg President Participates in EAIE Panel on Diversity and Inclusiveness

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg President Participates in EAIE Panel on Diversity and Inclusiveness

Wittenborg President Participates in EAIE Panel on Diversity and Inclusiveness

Peter Birdsall Highlights Need for Concrete Actions by Higher Education Institutions

Wittenborg president Peter Birdsall participated in the online panel ‘How to Mix All the Colours on Your Palette’ on 13 September. The event was organised as part of the 32nd European Association for International Education (EAIE) Conference, which this year took place in Barcelona, Spain.

Hosted by Manager of Accreditation and Member Services at the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) Marine Condette, the panel also featured Robert Buttery, Head of International Relations at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland.

Prompted by the question ‘Does internationalisation in higher education favour existing geopolitical socioeconomic inequalities?’, Birdsall addressed the ongoing debate in the Netherlands about the high numbers of international students in the country and the resources allocated to their accommodation and other needs. “Most Dutch people realise the importance of international diversity for the country, but there are groups who would like to see less internationalisation and less embracement of globalisation, and this makes the atmosphere less welcoming for international students. Overall, the Netherlands has been doing well when it comes to internationalisation, maintaining and balancing it against a changing political scenery,” he said.

Buttery, in turn, highlighted that nation-states have been historically diverse, due to factors such as migrations and the coexistence of different political systems. “Switzerland, for example, has always been a diverse country in terms of language, ethnicities and religion. The real issue is how to transform existing internationalisation policies, in order to create a sense of inclusivity and belonging for international students. Although there is no quick-fix, this is the beginning of the dialogue and it will help us define the actions we need to take in order to advance the agenda.”

Concrete Actions

The president of Wittenborg pointed out that the business school has actively worked to ensure diversity and inclusion within its student body, seeking to recruit people of different genders, cultures and regions of the world. “This involves continuous efforts from our marketing and recruitment teams, such as using student agents in different areas of the world and instructing teams to balance diversity and culture within the student body. Diversity management is key to making sure you get a good international business school, and it does not happen unless your team is aware of this approach. On top of that, it really helps if your team represents the continents, genders and religions of the students you are aiming to recruit.”

Wittenborg President Participates in EAIE Panel on Diversity and Inclusiveness

Arguing that higher education institutions need to break down the different areas of diversity and also look into the diversity that exists within countries, Buttery mentioned that the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland has adopted a “bottom-up approach”. “Our international office works closely with student associations, with the goal of encouraging the best practices concerning diversity. It is a nurturing approach, aimed not only at attracting students from diverse nation-states, but also at achieving better integration and interaction among them.”

Sense of Belonging

Both panellists stressed that creating a sense of belonging is essential for international schools, and this requires considerable investments and commitment by higher education institutions.

“Belonging is important, but it does add complexity to the operations. You need to have student support teams that are available online and offline to provide the students with the assistance they need. In addition to that, even though Wittenborg does not bring politics or religion into the way the organisation is managed, we do recognise that a lot of students feel more belonging if they have access to pastoral care. As such, the school has reached out to local faith institutions ranging from Christian, Muslim and Hindu organisations to find support networks for its students,” Birdsall affirmed.

In Buttery’s view, belonging plays a crucial role in fostering social and academic engagement. “We need comprehensive support systems to match the number of students we have been mobilising. As a result, institutions must make significant investments, but this can only work if they have the necessary resources to do so. In other words, they need to have a realistic approach when it comes to budget,” he concluded.



Working his Way Up: Wittenborg Graduate Becomes Manager at Hotel

by Wittenborg News -

Working his Way Up: Wittenborg Graduate Becomes Manager at Hotel

Working his Way Up: Wittenborg Graduate Becomes Manager at Hotel

Maaz Awan Highlights the Importance of Working Hard and Making Connections

“When you get a job, you have the opportunity to show people that you are a good professional and that leads you to other opportunities, such as promotions. The secret is hard work and being loyal. Sometimes, this can even result in good recommendation letters when you are changing jobs,” says Wittenborg graduate Maaz Awan, currently working as an assistant operations manager at the Odyssey Hotel Group.

Having obtained an MBM degree in International Hospitality Management at Wittenborg, Awan is originally from Pakistan and has been living in the Netherlands for almost eight years. Initially, he moved to the country to study for a bachelor’s degree in International Hospitality Management at NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences in Leeuwarden.

However, after completing the programme, he felt the need to go on learning new things and growing professionally. The graduate points out that he decided to join Wittenborg shortly before the COVID-19 pandemic reached the Netherlands. “It ended up being the ideal moment for starting a master’s programme, because there was not much going on in terms of work, since the hospitality sector was hit hard by the pandemic. Wittenborg had an advantage over other institutions because its entry dates were more convenient for me, but I was also attracted by the school’s diversity and international character and, on top of that, its fees were comparatively lower than other places.”

According to Awan, pursuing a master’s programme is a much more intense and eye-opening experience than studying for a bachelor’s degree. “It is a lot of information and you have to catch up with it. Although I had an academic supervisor, I also had to be my own supervisor and push myself by studying on a daily basis. During the master’s, I was treated like a grown up and a professional. I learned how to work independently and I developed my creativity and other skills. The teachers made it possible; they did not only teach me from an academic point of view, they also taught me how to be a better professional.”

Moving Forward

While studying for both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, Awan had the opportunity to do several internships as well as work regular jobs in the Netherlands. He says that the professional experiences he had while studying at Wittenborg were particularly important because they enabled him to connect theoretical knowledge to practice.

However, the graduate highlights that getting his first job – at the time when he lived in Leeuwarden – was not easy. “I went to every café, every restaurant and nobody would give me a job because I did not speak Dutch; it was really frustrating. But I did not give up, and eventually I got an internship at a restaurant. You will have disappointments in life, but there is also sunlight and it will be there if you do not give up.”

While working for the restaurant, Awan took the opportunity to learn Dutch by interacting with his colleagues – who could not speak English – as well as watching Netflix series with Dutch captions and listening to the local radio. Moreover, he started networking and making connections which, according to him, ended up being crucial for the progress of his career.  “You just cannot be hesitant when approaching people because you will never know if they will tell you ‘yes’ or ‘no’ unless you give it a try. By making new connections, I soon had the opportunity to start a traineeship at another company and that enabled me to gradually get better positions,” he points out.

Since March 2022, Awan has been working as an assistant operations manager at a hotel that is part of the Odyssey Group. In this position, he is responsible for ensuring that everything is running smoothly, including the kitchen, front office and food and beverage department, among other areas. The graduate says that being in a leadership role is a rewarding but challenging experience, adding that his main goal is to become a general manager in the future.

“I have always loved being a leader, and when I was a kid I used to be the captain of my school’s football team. At work, I never tell my colleagues that I am the boss and that they just need to do what I tell them. Instead, I always try to be their friend and a colleague on their level. Another great thing is that you do not need to stick to one department. You can go through multiple departments and implement your ideas. But this position involves great responsibilities and also demands that you work long hours, which can be difficult at times.”

Highlighting that he often has the opportunity to apply the knowledge he acquired at Wittenborg to his work, Awan encourages current and future students to take their studies seriously. “In addition to that, be honest to yourself, do not stay in a bubble and try to be always open for opportunities. Do not be scared to talk to directors if you are watching a guest lecture or visiting a business during a school activity. The more connections you make, the more opportunities you will have,” he stresses.

WUP 22/09/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

Paper Written by Wittenborg Staff Members Published by International Peer-Reviewed Journal

by Wittenborg News -

Paper Written by Wittenborg Staff Members Published by International Peer-Reviewed Journal

Paper Written by Wittenborg Staff Members Published by International Peer-Reviewed Journal

Study Analyses How Lecturers Assess Students

To better understand how lecturers of Dutch universities of applied sciences design assessments and examine students, two Wittenborg staff members and a lecturer from the University of Brighton co-wrote a study that was recently published by international peer-reviewed journal ‘Quality in Higher Education’. Titled ‘Learning-outcomes-based Assessments at Universities of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands: Perceptions of Business Lecturers’, the paper is authored by Wittenborg Head of the School of Business Rauf Abdul, Assurance of Learning Manager Kriszta Kaspers-Rostas and University of Brighton’s Principal Lecturer in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education John Canning.

As explained in the paper’s introduction, the research was motivated by concerns that emerged in the 2010s about the quality of assessments in certain universities of applied sciences. In response to that, the Netherlands Association of Universities of Applied Sciences (Vereniging Hogescholen) set up the External Validity Committee, which subsequently published a report that contained recommendations regarding assessment procedures and also stressed the importance of external validation.

Abdul highlights that it is crucial for higher education institutions (HEIs) to ensure that students achieve the established learning outcomes at the end of their programmes. “As part of one of the most international institutions in the Netherlands, we were interested in investigating how this is done at our institution and elsewhere in the country. This really helped us in understanding the best practices in this regard and showed us a few areas where there is room for improvement.”

In order to collect the data used in the study, the authors conducted individual interviews with 19 lecturers from ten diverse Dutch business schools. Among other topics, the interviews addressed how lecturers have adopted practices such as learning-outcomes-based assessments and a constructive alignment approach – both of which connect examination procedures to the overall learning goals of the module or course.

According to Assurance of Learning Manager Kriszta Kaspers-Rostas, by adopting a constructive alignment approach, lecturers and institutions have the opportunity to identify the discrepancies that arise between intended learning objectives and the achieved learning outcomes. She adds that if jobs require certain competencies from graduates, such as interpersonal communication, problem-solving skills and critical thinking, schools can correctly identify them and formulate the right learning objectives, but also need to develop the right instruments to measure these goals.

“This is important for the quality of teaching and learning, since if the integration is not done in a proper manner, we will be using the wrong testing instruments. One clear example is when, in traditional testing methods, the knowledge of the students is what is being primarily tested while their skills are overlooked, which is the opposite of what job markets are interested in.”

Need for Professional Development
 

The study finds that the most commonly used examination types in universities of applied sciences are closed-book invigilated written examinations, assignments and project work, followed by open-book invigilated written examinations – during which students are allowed to consult textbooks – and oral presentations. Respondents have expressed different opinions regarding the contribution of assessment methods in reaching the module intended learning outcomes and the programme’s final qualifications, with only 30% being able to clearly see a link and connect their assessments to the intended learning outcomes.

Moreover, although the research underscores that there is a systemic approach used across Dutch higher education institutions, the paper concludes that the recommendations concerning the improvement of assessments are not yet embedded into the culture and mindset of all those who teach and assess business students.

“While there is no claim that universities of applied sciences have failed to embed these processes into their central quality assurance practices, the lack of awareness about outcome-based assessment amongst some assessors needs to be investigated further. This would probably be best achieved through the professional development of staff via formal courses. Luckily, our lecturers at Wittenborg are clearly aware and continuously developing assessment practices that are in line with guidelines and support provided by the exam committee and the school’s Graduation & Examination Board,” Abdul stresses.

WUP 20/09/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press

'Praktisch Advies': Mental Health Services in the Netherlands

by Wittenborg News -

'Praktisch Advies': Mental Health Services in the Netherlands

'Praktisch Advies': Mental Health Services in the Netherlands

Everybody Needs Help Sometimes – Practical Advice

Your time at Wittenborg is meant to be fun and exciting. As you embark on a new academic journey – perhaps in a new country – you should be enthusiastic at the prospect of overcoming novel challenges and connecting with those you meet. We hope you are able to reflect fondly on your time here once you have left as an intellectually empowered graduate, ready to take on the world.

However, during your stay, some of you will inevitably struggle with issues that are difficult to explain to other people. You may need follow-up services for mental healthcare you received in your homeland. Perhaps after coming here, you have started to feel melancholic due to homesickness or stressed out as you enter another life stage. Maybe you have been dealing with certain feelings and habits for a while but have recently found yourself at a breaking point. Recognizing this possibility, Wittenborg has equipped your academic tutors with the knowledge to refer you to the proper professionals.

Finding a 'Huisarts' (GP)

If you are dealing with any mental health problems, you are urged to contact your academic tutor, who will refer you to a general practitioner, known in Dutch as huisarts. Your tutor can also help you figure out how to balance your education with your personal needs. By speaking up and asking for help, you can increase your quality of life and make the most out of your time here. You also do not have to tell your tutor anything about what you are going through, or even that your issue is psychological. You can just say that you would like to be referred to a doctor. In the Netherlands, you must be referred to a mental health practitioner by your huisarts.

If you don’t wish to speak with your academic tutor, you can use this handy tool made by the Dutch Patient Federation to search for a suitable doctor (nota bene: it is best to organise a doctor as soon as possible after you get here, as many locations are full and do not accept new patients). Once you find your match, you will have to make an appointment to give your huisarts an overview of your complaints. If your problems are too complex for them to help with, they will refer you to specialist care, and in some cases will prescribe you medication to alleviate your most urgent complaints.

In a previous article, we discussed the nature of health insurance in the Netherlands. To recap: non-working students on a study visa must take out international insurance from companies like AON or from their own country. Those with a working permit are obliged to take out basic insurance from a Dutch company, such as DSW. Make sure you choose a plan that covers the cost of mental healthcare, so that you are properly taken care of.

Crisis Care

In the Netherlands, you are considered to be in the midst of a mental health crisis when your normal coping mechanisms for everyday life no longer work for you. This can manifest in the form of panic attacks, delusions or threatening behaviour toward oneself or others. If you are experiencing a mental health crisis and already have a huisarts, you should contact them during office hours. They will then contact a local crisis intervention team if necessary. If you do not have a huisarts, or cannot get in contact with them for some reason, you are then urged to contact your local Centrale Huisartsen Post. This is a hub for doctors who work outside normal hours or on holidays.

Those living in Apeldoorn should call the Spoedpost Huistartsen Apeldoorn at 0900-600 9000, while those in Amsterdam should call the Huisartsenposten Amsterdam at 088-00 30 600. You may use these numbers for all non-life-threatening emergencies. Make sure you keep your ID, BSN number and any medical prescriptions nearby when you call. If you live outside of these areas, you can find what you need by searching “Centrale Huisartsen Post + (location)” via Google.

If you or someone you know is at immediate risk of harming themselves, you or they can call Zelfmoord Preventie by dialling 113, or 0800-0113. Are you not comfortable speaking over the phone? You can also use the chat feature on the Zelfmoord Preventie website. If you need help in your native language, you may use this website or this website to find services from your home country. In extreme cases, you may need to contact the Dutch general emergency services via the number 112. You can use this number for all emergency services, including the police, fire brigade or medical services.

As you study at Wittenborg, make sure to look out for one another, and reach out to those you feel may be struggling. A strong social support network is essential to one's wellbeing. If you sense a person is self-isolating, check in with them from time to time; it's better to be annoying than apathetic. We hope you found this article sufficiently informative.

WUP 18/09/2022
by Olivia Nelson
©WUAS Press

Beautiful Brinklaan: Wittenborg Family Loves New Campus

by Wittenborg News -
Beautiful Brinklaan: Wittenborg Family Loves New Campus

In with the New

Earlier this year Wittenborg's directors made the decision to purchase a new building to accommodate the rapid expansion of its student body and staff. The new building, located on Brinklaan street in Apeldoorn, is already well-loved by those who enter.

The façade of the building sports neat panels in Wittenborg's signature royal blue. When strolling around the back of the building, one is greeted by a beautiful fountain adorned with lily pads, aquatic plants and Wittenborg's name. There is also a convenient parking lot for cars and bikes at the back, with charging stations for electric vehicles. The parking lot also functions as a space to hold outdoor events like Wittenborg's Annual BBQ, which was attended this year by Deputy Mayor of Apeldoorn, Jeroen Joon.

The atmosphere of the Brinklaan building was carefully designed to be comfortable for all who visit. The interior features updated classrooms, spacious offices, convenient eating spaces and large windows. Upon entrance, guests are greeted by a front desk and a cosy seating area with leather chairs. If one wanders upstairs to the first floor, there is a small canteen that houses a coffee machine – absolutely essential to Wittenborg's functioning.

Tinted windows allow just the right amount of sunlight and automatic lights throughout the building ensure minimal energy wastage. Meanwhile the new air-conditioning system keeps the building at a suitable temperature. In the spirit of Apeldoorn – a Green City – greenery is peppered throughout the building, while donated paintings impart character to the offices.

Beautiful Brinklaan: Wittenborg Family Loves New Campus

Happy Students and Alumni

Freshman student Beniamin says he was happy to see the new building, which he hoped would positively affect how people study. Indeed, when standing inside a room, one can notice how calm and quiet the atmosphere is. This is thanks to the double-glazed windows, which reduce sound from outside and will make sure the building stays warm during colder months. Although, the neighbourhood is already relatively calm during the day in any case.

Visiting alumni, Tulya – who studied at the former Aventus campus – was also enthusiastic about the change. Although her time studying at Wittenborg has come to an end, she is excited for incoming students. “I think it's a great building, and it is nice that it's just across from the Amaliapark. So lucky.”

Staff Impressions

When visiting the new building from his native Amsterdam campus, Professor Dadi Chen remarked that the purchase of Brinklaan was a wise decision on the part of Wittenborg's directors. “I think it’s great! Beautiful building. I like the place.” Members of Wittenborg's Apeldoorn staff were satisfied with the extra breathing room, while some staff members were sad to leave their former office space.

“One thing I did like about the Aventus building was that most of us were working together in the same room, so it was easy to get to know each other,” expressed a member of staff. “But I know we will make it work, and this is such a lovely building. It was time for a change anyway.” Other staff members liked the new department-specific seating. “Brinklaan feels like more of a ‘real’ office building,” says Bishal Bhandari, Wittenborg's Communications Administrator. “Now things are more organised and we have our own rooms. It's more peaceful to work like this.”

Wittenborg looks forward to settling into its new home at the Brinklaan campus. Wittenborg's ever-growing pool of students are sure to thrive and excel at the location.

WUP 16/09/2022
by Olivia Nelson
©WUAS Press

Beautiful Brinklaan: Wittenborg Family Loves New Campus
Beautiful Brinklaan: Wittenborg Family Loves New Campus
Beautiful Brinklaan: Wittenborg Family Loves New Campus

Wittenborg Adopts Multidisciplinary Exit Exams (MEEs)

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg Adopts Multidisciplinary Exit Exams (MEEs)

Exams to Be Taken at End of Each Learning Phase

Exams to Be Taken at End of Each Learning Phase

With the goal of monitoring and evaluating the progress of its students from a more comprehensive and in-depth perspective, Wittenborg is implementing Multidisciplinary Exit Exams (MEEs) from the academic year 2022-2023. Therefore, in addition to the normal assessments that lead to credits, students will also be required to complete an MEE at the end of each learning phase. This means that, for bachelor’s students, there will be a multidisciplinary exit exam at the end of phase 1, phase 2 and phase 3, while for master’s students the exit exam is at the end of semester 2.

The MEEs will take content from all taught modules from either the completed phase or, in the case of the master’s programmes, both semesters. The examinations might take one of three different formats: closed-book exams (generally multiple choice), open-book exams (with students having the opportunity to access the internet) and presentations or interviews.

Although technically students cannot fail a multidisciplinary exit exam, there will be the letter F which indicates that the student should not be advised to progress. The grades will be based on letter grades in line with ECTS, and should be seen as an indication of a student’s knowledge.

According to Wittenborg president Peter Birdsall, the new exams will enable students to better evaluate their educational progress as well as the development of competencies required to become business administrators and managers. “This is a really innovative procedure, because it is the first time that a Dutch private business school adopts this type of exam. For this reason, over the next couple of years the MEE will be in its experimental phase. Even though there is no pass requirement, the letter-grade received on one’s exam will be included in the academic transcripts. Therefore, a good performance will make graduates stand out in the eyes of employers.”

MEEs are compulsory and must be taken by all students in order to graduate. The criteria for being eligible to take a MEE is that the student must have completed (passed) all the modules in the relevant study phase. Bachelor’s students are not allowed to start any phase 3 modules unless they have at least completed the phase 1 exit exam. Moreover, a phase 2 exit exam must be completed before a graduation assignment proposal is accepted. Master’s students, in turn, must complete the MEE before submitting their final graduation assignment.

The exams will be held twice a year in the retake weeks, allowing ample time for students to plan their assessments.

WUP 14/9/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press


Wittenborg’s Student Accommodation Welcomes 58 New Residents

by Wittenborg News -

Wittenborg’s Student Accommodation Welcomes 58 New Residents

Wittenborg’s Student Accommodation Welcomes 58 New Residents

All Students who Applied for Housing Provided with Rooms

For 58 students who have just started their programmes at Wittenborg, the business school is not only the place where they have the opportunity to expand their knowledge and make new friends, but also their new home. All of the students who applied for Wittenborg’s student housing before this block and fulfilled the requirements – having obtained a visa and paid the accommodation fees – have managed to get a room provided by the institution.

While 49 new students are living in the facilities owned and managed by Wittenborg, nine are making use of the services offered by the school’s partner company FSG. In total, Wittenborg currently offers 74 beds, but 75 new apartments are being built by the institution on De Ruyterstraat, close to the Brinklaan building and the already existing dorm. The new facilities are expected to be operational by early 2023.

Wittenborg’s Student Accommodation Welcomes 58 New Residents

According to Wittenborg president Peter Birdsall, by offering accommodation services to its students, the school intends to provide them with comfort and convenience. “This becomes even more crucial when we consider that the Netherlands is going through a long-standing housing crisis and many students from other institutions are having a hard time finding a place to stay. Our goal, at Wittenborg, is to help our students make the most of their experience in the Netherlands, and by solving the problem of housing we take that weight off their shoulders so that they can focus on other important things.”

Olga Ualikhankyzy, a Kazakhstani student who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Hospitality Management, said that she really enjoys living in Wittenborg’s student accommodation and highlighted the quality of the facilities. “It is all very nice and you have the chance to meet a lot of new people from different countries, which helps you feel less homesick. Knowing that I would have a place to stay in the Netherlands made me feel more comfortable and less nervous and anxious about moving abroad, and everyone has been really helpful and friendly so far,” she pointed out.

WUP 12/9/2022
by Ulisses Sawczuk
©WUAS Press



Queen Elizabeth II,1926-2022

by Wittenborg News -
Queen Elizabeth II,1926-2022
 

Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences is deeply saddened to hear of the death of Her Majesty The Queen

WUAS Statement: Her Majesty Queen Elisabeth II embodied stability and continuity, she was also a rock on which the concepts of internationalisation, diversity and ethics have become the normality in many parts of the world, values that are so important to us at Wittenborg. The Queen’s reign defined much of the history in the 20th and early 21st centuries of the UK, the Commonwealth, and many parts of the modern world.

We will remember her, and our condolences to everyone affected by The Queens passing today.

08.09.2022

 

(Edited by Peter Birdsall - original submission Thursday, 8 September 2022, 10:03 PM)

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