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    Understanding the Russian Mindset in Choosing a University
    by Wittenborg News - Thursday, 16 April 2015, 11:05 PM
     

    Understanding the Russian Mindset in Choosing a University

    "What would trigger Russian students to study abroad, particularly in the Netherlands?"

    "What would trigger Russian students to study abroad, particularly in the Netherlands?"This question was explored by Russian expert, Nadia Sintotskaya, who gave a guest lecture at Wittenborg University this week on “the Russian psyche”.

    “Russia is a country in transition – it is hard to predict what will happen next week, next year,” Sintotskaya warned, referring to the international storm the country is weathering due its tumultuous relationship with the West and its involvement in the Ukraine.

    According to her Russians who can afford to send their children to study abroad are very particular in ensuring that they receive a good education and will be very careful in selecting countries.

    Wittenborg News reported last week that the depreciation of the ruble means many Russians are abandoning traditional choices like the UK and Switzerland as study destinations and are looking for cheaper alternatives like the Netherlands which still offers a high quality education at a better price and have English-taught programmes.

    In a city like Moscow universities will easily charge students €10 000 or more per year, Sintotskaya said. She advised institutes like Wittenborg who wants to attract Russian students to recruit in “big cities, where there is a better chance of potential students being able to speaking English”.

    She also warned institutes not only to rely on education fairs, but also invest in media campaigns. “Especially social media, though students will not appreciate it if they get spammed with lots of material,” Sintotskaya said. According to her the distinction made in the Netherlands between research universities and universities of applied science is a foreign concept to Russians.

    “About 54% of the Russian labour force has attained tertiary education of some sort (World Bank, 2008). Completing a Bachelor of...

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    Wittenborg News
    Private Universities like Wittenborg Applauded for its Initiatives by Dutch Inspectorate of Education
    by Wittenborg News - Wednesday, 15 April 2015, 11:05 PM
     

    Private Universities like Wittenborg Applauded for its Initiatives by Dutch Inspectorate of Education

    Private Universities like Wittenborg Applauded for its Initiatives by Dutch Inspectorate of Education

    Private universities of applied science, like Wittenborg, received praise for the quality of its education and its professionalism from the Dutch inspectorate of education in its 2013-2014 report on the state of education in the Netherlands.

    The report was presented at a congres by the new inspector-general of education, Monique Vogelzang.

    Its positive tone about privately funded HBO’s (Universities of Applied Science) echoes a visit by representatives of the inspectorate to Wittenborg last month in a friendly exchange of information with the management of the University.

    The report’s favorable view on private HBO’s stands in sharp contrast to concerns about especially private vocational institutes (MBO’s) whose operations and procedures raised many questions.

    Though the report states that information about operations at most private HBO’s was only available to a certain extent, it expressed appreciation for a number of practices observed at these institutes.

    This includes the fact that structural educational evalutions  – such as the National Student Survey (NSE) - are deemed important by private HBO’s and their outcomes incorporated in the educational and administrative activities of the these intsitutes. “Private institutes are very attentive to the quality of education they offer and the professionalism of their staff,” the report states.

    The inspectorate was also impressed that more than 80% of of private institutes have a procedure in place for handling complaints despite not being obliged by Dutch legislation to do so.

    It also differentiates between privately funded institutes who are members of the Netherlands Board for Training and Education (NRTO) – such as Wittenborg -  and those who are not. Member institutes, it notes, left a more positive impression ...

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    Wittenborg News
    Students at Universities Offering Joint Programmes have Higher Value on the Job Market
    by Wittenborg News - Sunday, 12 April 2015, 10:18 PM
     

    Students at Universities Offering Joint Programmes have Higher Value on the Job Market

    Students at Universities Offering Joint Programmes have Higher Value on the Job Market

    Universities offering joint study programmes and double degrees –  as Wittenborg University does in partnership with the University of Brighton in the UK – add extra value to its students on the international labour market.

    Such is the belief of the Netherlands Association for Research Universities (VSNU) who is encouraging Dutch universities to follow suit. “Joint programmes contribute to the development of students’ international skills. These students are then of higher value to the international labour market. The Dutch market also benefits off the widened talents of students with experience abroad,” the organization said in a statement.

    Students at Universities Offering Joint Programmes have Higher Value on the Job Market Since July 2010 Dutch institutions of higher education are allowed to offer joint training with one or more Dutch or foreign institutes.

    Wittenborg has been working closely with the University of Brighton since 2007, mainly with the School of Service Management and Sport, based in the town of Eastbourne. 

    The partnership has now developed from what was initially a possibility for students to do their final year in the UK, to Wittenborg offering dual-taught Master of Science programmes in Apeldoorn, and developing joint research projects with its counterparts in the UK.

    The current MSc programmes on offer are:

    Master of Science in International Event Management

    Master of Science in International Hospitality Management

    Master of Science in Tourism Management

    In September 2012 Wittenborg University admitted its first cohort of international Master of Science students, followed by another intake in September 2013. The first graduates from these two groups received their double degrees the past winter from Wittenborg as well as Brighton.

    In 2016, a new MSc in International Sports Business & Management will start. Applications will be...

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    Wittenborg News
    A 10% Rise in Wittenborg Students Participating in NSE Survey
    by Wittenborg News - Thursday, 9 April 2015, 11:09 PM
     

     A 10% Rise in Wittenborg Students Participating in National Student Survey (NSE)

    A 10% Rise in Wittenborg Students Participating in National Student Survey (NSE)

    Students at Wittenborg University are finding it increasingly important to make their voices heard!

    Almost 40% took part in the National Student Survey (NSE) this year, which is 9.8% higher than in 2014.  Participating in the 2015 NSE closed on 8 March and the results will be announced on 21 May via www.studiekeuze123.nl

    A whopping 712 280 students from 72 universities and other institutions of higher education in the Netherlands had their say about their studies and institutions by participating in the survey. This year the national response rate was 39.1%, compared to 33.7% last year. 

    At Wittenborg the response rate was 29% last year. This year it shot up to 38.8% - proving how important it is for students at Wittenborg to give their opinion on their studies. The fact that it is just 0.3% lower than the national response rate, while at the same time growing faster, is impressive given Wittenborg’s small size compared to other big universities in the country. 

    Last year Wittenborg attained an overall score of 7.5, thereby not only improving on its score from the previous year, but also beating the national average. One of the categories where the university scored above average were study content, including an improved mark on the question of whether content matched the student’s expectations and the quality of the study material. 

    Students were also happy with lecturers, including their field expertise, accessibility and feedback although there was a drop from last year. Other categories where Wittenborg scored above the national average were study facilities, the size of classes and groups, workload, the supply of information, timetables, the measuring of performance such as exams, study facilities as well as the research and general capacity within the university

    The NSE is a...

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    Wittenborg News
    Netherlands an Attractive Alternative for Russian Students Facing Fallout from Russia's Involvement in the Ukraine crisis
    by Wittenborg News - Sunday, 5 April 2015, 11:58 PM
     

    Netherlands an Attractive Alternative for Russian Students Facing Fallout from Russia's Involvement in the Ukraine crisisNetherlands an Attractive Alternative for Russian Students Facing Fallout from Russia's Involvement in the Ukraine crisis

    Universities in the Netherlands is seen as an attractive and cheaper alternative for Russian students wishing to study abroad, but feeling stranded by the depreciation of their currency caused by the immense political pressure Russia is facing over the crisis in Ukraine.

    Wittenborg University, one of the most international universities in the Netherlands, is gearing up to receive more Russian students. It already has a number of Russian students and several from former USSR countries like Kazakhstan, Georgia and Ukraine.Wittenborg University, one of the most international universities in the Netherlands, is gearing up to receive more Russian students. The University already has a number of Russian students and several from former USSR countries like Kazakhstan, Georgia and Ukraine.

    Wittenborg CEO, Peter Birdsall, just returned from the ICEF Workshop in Moscow where he met with at least 45 agents recruiting Russian students for studying abroad.

    Birdsall yesterday told IBA students at Wittenborg doing a Project Week assignment on Russia, that the UK is traditionally the most popular study destination for Russian students, alongside Switzerland for those studying hospitality.

    However, due to economic restrains caused by the political pressure Russia is under from the United States and the European Union because of its involvement in the Ukraine, students are looking for alternative study destinations like the Netherlands. The Netherlands has just been named as one of the top 6 countries with the most prestigious universities in the world.

    Wittenborg University, one of the most international universities in the Netherlands, is gearing up to receive more Russian students. It already has a number of Russian students and several from former USSR countries like Kazakhstan, Georgia and Ukraine.Birdsall said in the UK foreign high school students can pay up to £40,000 per annum in boarding school fees, including accommodation. Varsity students in the UK face a bill of more £9 000 per year for tuition fees while it is considerably lower in the Netherlands. At Wittenborg the tuition fee for all its bachelor programmes is €6,300 per year. UK lecturer, Bob Dyson (left) gave his take on the Russian market, Bob has for years done business around the world with countries ...

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    Wittenborg News
    Wittenborg at Event15! - Presenting Event Management in the Digital Age
    by Wittenborg News - Friday, 3 April 2015, 12:07 PM
     

    Wittenborg at Event15! - Presenting Event Management in the Digital Age

    Wittenborg at Event15! - Presenting Event Management in the Digital Age

    According to Event Management Blog Sites, the word defining the event industry for 2015 is” drench” and Director Peter Birdsall, discussed this and other aspects of the modern business to business event at the Event15 fair held today in the Dutch city of Utrecht.

    The Event15 fair, held over 2 days, gave event management planners, vendors and hospitality companies the opportunity to network and meet and greet new customers. Wittenborg's stand was staffed by 3 of its business students, Raymon, Annick and Mathew!
     
    Wittenborg at Event15! - Presenting Event Management in the Digital Age The concept of “Drench” is to make the attendees of an event feel that they actually own the space and the content being presented, that they are part of the product, that they have actually been invited to the event because they are part of the subject of the event.

    Technology is crucial in the event of 2015, - attendees are more knowledgeable and connected than ever before, and their expertise with technology is now high and therefore they expect to experience and event that is interlinked to social media, to the web, to multimedia and to interactivity.
     
    Successful events in 2015 will break the boundaries between visitors, professionals, performers, managers and venues and those that make the experience more personal, persuasive, impressive, interactive, touchable, even overwhelming and therefore unforgettable through the use of technology will succeed in “drenching” the participants in what can be seen as a “total immersive” experience.
     
    Wittenborg at Event15! - Presenting Event Management in the Digital Age Wittenborg University at Event15! - Presenting Event Management in the Digital AgeAlthough events can often be defined in the areas of sport, music, drama and performance art, more than 70% of events organized worldwide are “corporate events” – meetings, launches, debates, company parties and galas – these are even more likely to be successful in this time of digital connectivity if the concept of “drenching” is employed.
     
    ...

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    Wittenborg News
    The Netherlands is one of the top six countries in the world with the most prestigious universities
    by Wittenborg News - Monday, 30 March 2015, 11:20 PM
     

    The Netherlands is one of the top six countries in the world with the most prestigious universities.

    The Netherlands is one of the top six countries in the world with the most prestigious universities

    The country increased its share of institutions in a global ranking of universities who enjoys the most respect and admiration from leading academics around the world.

    The results of the Times Higher Education (THE) World Reputation Rankings show the Netherlands, together with Australia and France, has 5 institutes in the top 100 – last year it had 4 institutes in the top 100. The list is dominated by the so-called super league universities in the United States and Britain which combined have 55 institutes in the top 100, followed by Germany who has 6. The top 3 universities on the list are: Harvard University in the US, followed by the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford which are both in the UK.

    The Netherlands however holds its own with 5 institutes in the top 100 which makes it one of the top 3 most prestigious countries in Europe when it comes to institutes of higher education.

    And in the Netherlands Wittenborg University is one of the most international institutes in the country by boasting more than 60 different nationalities among staff and students – punching way above its size.

     Times Higher Education partnered with Elsevier to disseminate the Academic Reputation Survey on which the results are based. Questionnaires, which asked participants to nominate up to 10 of the best institutions in their field of expertise, were completed by 10 000 academics selected to give a statistically representative sample of global scholars. Responses from more than 140 countries were received.

    THE’s ranking editor, Phil Baty, wrote in a special supplement to magazine, that “a strong reputation helps universities to attract global talent and funding; attracting global talent and cash (in turn) help to sustain strong reputations”.

    “A strong reputation not only indicates ...

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    Wittenborg News
    Wittenborg University at the ICEF Moscow Workshop 2015
    by Wittenborg News - Friday, 27 March 2015, 7:53 AM
     

    Wittenborg University is pleased to be attending the ICEF Workshop in Moscow this weekend and its CEO, Mr Peter Birdsall, has a full schedule booked to speak to agents from around the world

    Wittenborg University at the ICEF Moscow Workshop 2015

     - see the Wittenborg Moscow ICEF 2015 Newsletter - 

    Wittenborg University is pleased to be attending the ICEF Workshop in Moscow this weekend and its Director of International Relations, Mr Peter Birdsall, has a full schedule booked to speak to agents from around Russia and its neighbouring countries in the region. “We are a private international University with more than 60 nationalities working and studying together in one of the most exclusively intercultural study environments in the Netherlands. We offer Bachelor and Master programmes in the School of Business and the School of Hospitality & Tourism and are looking forward to working with new agencies and partners to continue the growth of the current student body, as well as re-establishing and maintaining links with existing representatives”.

    The use of agents for the recruitment of students in the Dutch higher education sector is not widely documented, although the National Commission, responsible for the Code of Conduct for International Students in the Netherlands, tries hard to monitor Universities’ use of study abroad agencies.

    The Higher Education Workshop facilitates targeted, pre-scheduled, one-to-one business meetings between educators, quality higher education focussed agents and international education service providers.In the past 10 years, Wittenborg has built a good network of agencies in many of the key recruitment countries, such as China, Vietnam, Pakistan, Nepal and Nigeria, however in the past three years has been working hard to develop many contacts in new countries, such as Russia, Ukraine, Indonesia and South Africa, as well as closer to home, for instance in Germany and the UK.

    Wittenborg attended its first ICEF Moscow workshop last year and the outing has immediately resulted in an increased interest from Russian-speaking students.

    “We are hoping to further increase our internationality through these events” says Birdsall. “We reached our target of 50 different nationalities at any one time, two years ago and are now aiming at the next ...

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    Wittenborg News
    Wittenborg Research: What stops SME's from Adopting Sustainable Energy Solutions?
    by Wittenborg News - Thursday, 26 March 2015, 10:14 PM
     

    Wittenborg Research: What stops SME's from Adopting Sustainable Energy Solutions?

    Wittenborg Research: What stops SME's from Adopting Sustainable Energy Solutions?

    What are the obstacles and the barriers preventing SME’s from adopting sustainable solutions for renewable energy?
    Wittenborg University, one of the Dutch partners of the GREAT-project, recently explored this question by doing small-scale research among SME’s in Belgium and the Netherlands in conjunction with its Belgian counterparts, leading to interesting results. Senior Wittenborg lecturer, Dr Saskia Harkema, was involved in the research.

    SME's indicated one of the main reasons why they would adopt and implement "green energy" is to improve their company's image. Tax advantages and attracting new customers was also cited as good reasons to invest.

    On the downside, high costs associated with the implementation of such a policy was mentioned as one of the main barriers for shying away from sustainable solutions. Though, in the Netherlands this is seen as less important than in Belgium. However the biggest barriers for SME's not investing was listed as not finding appropriate personnel and the low impact of organizational activities on the environment.
    Nonetheless, the majority of SME’s agreed that the investment in the long term is worth more than the initial costs in the short term. All of them indicated they wanted more information environmentally friendly plans that could have a positive impact on the performance of the their organizations.

    Return on investment is the most important indicator to determine the level of possible investments that should be made. Most companies define that in terms of  pay-out time, instead of effectiveness and efficacy. Companies want to see results within 5 years, sometimes even after 1 year.
    When speaking to SMEs and intermediate organizations that work with SMEs, they indicated to researchers that investing in sustainability is not a priority and this may have to ...

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    Wittenborg News
    Students Who Go Abroad are More Creative and Independent, says Nuffic Chair
    by Wittenborg News - Sunday, 22 March 2015, 9:36 PM
     

    Students Who Go Abroad are More Creative and Independent, says Nuffic Chair

    Students Who Go Abroad are More Creative and Independent, says Nuffic Chair

    People who spend at least part of their studies abroad are more creative in solving problems, find a job quicker and often their starter salaries are higher than that of their peers. This is according to Freddy Weima, chairperson of EP-Nuffic’s board of directors. EP-Nuffic is the Dutch organization promoting internationalization in higher education.

    Weima recently expressed concerns about the fact that there are less Dutch students doing an internship or studying abroad compared to their contemporaries in other European countries. This came to light in a study done by ResearchNed which showed young Dutch people prefer to stay close to their families in Holland rather than seek adventure and experience abroad.

    “Spending part of your studies abroad carries so much value. You meet new people and become more independent because you have to rely on your own wits to survive in a foreign environment.

    The majority of students at Wittenborg University are from abroad while its Dutch students made a conscious decision to study in an international environment.

    According to the ResearchNed study the biggest obstacle preventing Dutch students from studying going abroad is a reluctance to be separated from family, friends or a partner (39%). One respondent said: “I am currently living with my parents and leaving them is already a big step. To leave them and the country will be too much for me.”

    Weima said many people, once they enter the job market, regret not going overseas while they were studying. From the study it appears that 70% of parents encourage their children to take a gap year between high school and university, instead of standing in their way. A further 57% even stimulate their children spend their undergraduate studies abroad.

    Source: www.nuffic.nl

    WUP 22/3/2015

    ©Wittenborg University Press

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