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    Facts about Studying in Holland
    by Wittenborg News - Wednesday, 23 August 2017, 9:42 AM
     

    Facts about Studying in Holland

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/facts-about-studying-holland.htm


    Facts about Studying in HollandWant to study in the Netherlands, but confused about the Dutch higher education system? With the new academic year beckoning, we separate fact from fiction to make your decision easier:

    1. At the last count, the Netherlands still boasted the highest number of English-taught programmes in continental Europe – pretty impressive for a country which is 9 times smaller than the Germany and 237 times smaller than the US!

    2. And while we are comparing size – Dutch people are on average the tallest in the world!

    3. Holland has a binary education system:

    • Research universities (WO) - offers research-orientated education
    • Universities of Applied Sciences (HBOs) – offer higher professional education which focuses on the practical application of arts and sciences.

    4. At both types of university you can do a bachelor's as well as master's degree programme, but only research universities offer the opportunity to do a PhD.

    5. At most Dutch institutes you have the possibility of starting your programme either in September or February – however, Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences offers candidates 6 entrée dates per year, and therefor six opportunities to graduate.

    6. In Holland, international students from outside the EU are allowed to work up to 10 hours a week alongside their studies or, instead, work full-time during the summer months of June, July and August.

    7. As of this year, non-EU students and researchers in the Netherlands are officially allowed to form their own companies while studying.

    8. Dutch institutes generally score highly in international education rankings.

    9. After finishing their studies in the Netherlands, international graduates are allowed 12 months to look for a job.

    10. The Netherlands has just been ranked in the Top 5 of the most ...

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    Wittenborg News
    Holland 4th Best Innovative Country in Europe
    by Wittenborg News - Saturday, 19 August 2017, 12:54 PM
     

    Holland 4th Best Innovative Country in Europe

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/holland-4th-best-innovative-country-europe.htm

    Holland 4th Best Innovative Country in EuropeThe Netherlands is the 4th best country in Europe when it comes to innovation, according to the recently published 2017 European Innovation Scoreboard. The ranking is based on data collected in 2016 and compiled by the European Commission.

    According to the report, Sweden remains the EU innovation leader, followed by Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, the UK, and Germany. The Netherlands is also to be found among the fastest growing innovators – the top 5 are Lithuania, Malta, the UK, the Netherlands and Austria.

    The report states that EU innovation performance continues to increase, especially due to improvements in human resources, the innovation-friendly environment, own-resource investments, and attractive research systems.

    Contributing to the Netherlands’ innovation strength is an attractive research system, good human resources and linkages. However, it is considered weak in firm investments, sales impacts and intellectual assets.

    WUP 19/8/2017

    by James Wittenborg
    ©Wittenborg University Press

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    Holland Grapples with Education Language Policies in the Face of Globalisation
    by Wittenborg News - Thursday, 17 August 2017, 2:04 PM
     

    Holland Grapples with Education Language Policies in the Face of Globalisation

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/holland-grapples-education-language-policies-face-globalisation.htm


    Holland Grapples with Education Language Policies in the Face of GlobalisationThe incumbent Dutch minister of higher education, Jet Bussemaker, has urged institutions of higher education to pay more attention to the intercultural skills of students and lecturers, and to make sure the latter are well equipped to teach in English.

    At Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences all Bachelor and Master programmes are taught entirely in English and its students and staff represent more than 80 different nationalities.

    Bussemaker was reacting to a recent study by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), meant to give direction to the incoming cabinet on the country’s language policies in higher education pertaining to Dutch and English.

    With its high number of English-taught university programmes, the Netherlands is a popular destination for international students. However, within the country the ascendance of English has sparked much debate, prompting the government to order an explorative study to ascertain the value of giving instruction in Dutch and English.

    The study was presented by Bussemaker in parliament after she requested that the academy last year look into the effects of the increasing use of English in higher education on professional practice, on the progress of students into and within higher education, and on Dutch culture and society.

    The report points out that one of the advantages of instruction in English is that it allows foreign students to enter the Dutch education system, thereby promoting an international classroom. 

    “Institutions argue that the presence of foreign students and international staff can have a positive effect on the quality of the study programme. Generally speaking, instruction in English is also considered of ‘better quality’...

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    Wittenborg News
    Defining Success - Wittenborg Graduates Share their Thoughts
    by Wittenborg News - Sunday, 13 August 2017, 12:12 PM
     

    Defining Success - Wittenborg Graduates Share their Thoughts

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/defining-success-wittenborg-graduates-share-their-thoughts.htm

    How do international students at Wittenborg define success? We asked a few of our graduates at the recent 2017 Summer Graduation Ceremony to share their thoughts on the subject and got some interesting answers:

    Defining Success - Wittenborg Graduates Share their ThoughtsSabah Parveen from Hong Kong: “Success for me is when you not only create opportunity for yourself, but for others too. It’s about doing something that allows you to be the best person you can be and having satisfaction at the end of the day.”

    Chao Meng from China: “I think success means you achieve what you wanted – not that which is valued by other people.”

    Karen Turay from Holland: “Achieving wealth, respect and fame.”

    Tra Duong from Vietnam: “To win (the struggle) against yourself and act in order to achieve your goals. You pass your own limits, know who you are and what you are aiming for.”

    Jiaqi Cen from China: “Success lies in the process of achieving your goals – people can learn something for themselves which helps them to know the world better, either physical or psychological. Different people have different goals or dreams, however, not 100% of your targets can be achieved.”m

    Ziaul Hasnayen from Bangladesh: “I define success as a journey not a destination.”

    Ana Maria Villalobos Cedano: “Success is when you achieve what you set out to do after sacrificing and fighting day by day for what you want.”

    WUP 13/8/2017

    by Anesca Smith
    ©Wittenborg University Press

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    Wittenborg's New Quality Officer Speaks Four Languages
    by Wittenborg News - Friday, 11 August 2017, 9:57 AM
     

    Wittenborg's New Quality Officer Speaks Four Languages


    Wittenborg's New Quality Officer Speaks Four LanguagesAfter a successful research period at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences, the institute has appointed Kriszta Rostás as its new education and quality support officer, thereby investing more resources in quality improvements.

    Kriszta, who is Hungarian, has a Master degree in Economics & Business from the University of Utrecht.  She grew up in Romania and speaks four languages: English, Dutch, Romanian and Hungarian. Kriszta is the latest addition to Wittenborg’s already multicultural staff members with almost 20 different nationalities between them.

    She located permanently to the Netherlands in 2013 after partaking in a student exchange programme. Before joining Wittenborg as a researcher in January assessing the quality of its exams, she worked as a research co-worker at Windesheim University of Applied Sciences in Zwolle and at a Dutch SME helping companies in developing countries.

    As of August she has been appointed as education and quality support officer at Wittenborg, making sure the university not only adheres to set academic standards but also improves it to the extent of becoming a leader in the market.

    She loves living in the Netherlands, especially the relaxed attitude of its inhabitants. “Before, living in Romania, I saw myself as someone who has a nervous energy. Here I am more relaxed.” Outside of work she likes cooking, swimming and used to be a Hungarian folk dancer.

    WUP 11/8/2017

    by Anesca Smith
    ©Wittenborg University Press

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    Wittenborg Graduate Study Explores How Governments can Empower Refugees Economically
    by Wittenborg News - Wednesday, 9 August 2017, 1:12 PM
     

    Wittenborg Graduate Study Explores How Governments can Empower Refugees Economically

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/wittenborg-graduate-study-explores-how-governments-can-empower-refugees-economically.htm


    Wittenborg Graduate Study Explores How Governments can Empower Refugees EconomicallyThe influx of refugees to Europe is a fact, but how do governments ease the financial burden on themselves and make these refugees economically independent?

    This pressing, contemporary issue is explored by Wittenborg graduate, Eshban Jan in his final thesis submitted before graduating earlier this summer. Eshban, from Pakistan, has been awarded an IBA (Bachelor) degree in Marketing and Communication.

    In the first 10 months of 2016 the majority of the 46 000 people who applied for refugee status in the Netherlands were from war-torn Syria, followed by Eritrea where military service is compulsory. Smaller groups come from Pakistan, Iraq and Afghanistan where people are being persecuted based on religion and/or race.

    According to Eshban, despite the fact that refugees is a critical issue for many governments, literature on the empowerment of refugees is scarce. His study takes a critical look at the work of the Dutch refugee empowerment organization CAO (Centraal Orgaan Opvang Azielzoekers). Dutch policies on refugees are seen as one of the toughest in Europe.

    About 98% of refugees who participated in Eshban’s study stated that they would like to work in the Netherlands and more than 40% has professional skills. “Although the Dutch government provide resources to refugees to integrate them through agencies such as COA, refugees are not allowed to work or study when they arrive. The asylum application process period is minimum 6 months, but it can take years.” He recommends the Dutch government to grant study and labour market access to refugees as they arrive to make them more self-reliant. “The International Monetary Foundation (IMF) also advises host governments to make it easier ...

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    Wittenborg News
    "I Came to Study in Holland Because of a Movie"
    by Wittenborg News - Saturday, 5 August 2017, 8:06 PM
     

    "I Came to Study in Holland Because of a Movie"

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/i-came-study-holland-because-movie.htm


    "I Came to Study in Holland Because of a Movie"For Wittenborg graduate Zuwang Chen it was love at first sight: He saw a romantic movie which was shot in the Netherlands and he knew he wanted to study here.

    Chen, who is from China, graduated with a Bachelor degree (IBA) in Economics & Management from Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences this summer.

    So, what was the movie? Turns out he saw a Korean movie called Daisy (Deiji) – an urban romantic drama by Hong Kong director Andrew Lau. It shows lots of Holland’s lush, green countryside as well as give a glimpse of what living in a Dutch city looks like.

    Chen’s choice of Wittenborg was more grounded: “I chose Wittenborg because of its flexibility and it’s a nice place with kind people.” How did studying at Wittenborg change him? “It made my life more colourful!”

    As for his plans for the future: “I would like to find a job, but at the same time I am working towards starting my own company in the fashion industry.”

    WUP 5/8/2017

    by Anesca Smith
    ©Wittenborg University Press

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    Wittenborg Writer Ben Birdsall's Adventures in Search of Good Irish Whisky Charms Radio Listeners
    by Wittenborg News - Thursday, 3 August 2017, 1:48 PM
     

    Wittenborg Writer Ben Birdsall's Adventures in Search of Good Irish Whisky Charms Radio Listeners

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/wittenborg-writer-ben-birdsalls-adventures-search-good-irish-whisky-charms-radio-listeners.htm


    Wittenborg Writer Ben Birdsall's Adventures in Search of Good Irish Whisky Charms Radio Listeners“You’ve heard about slow food? This is slow drinking.”

    This is how Wittenborg writer, Ben Birdsall, described his round-trip along the Irish coast the past 3 weeks cruising at 40km an hour on his 1979 Vespa while visiting whisky distilleries for his upcoming book on the topic. The book will be illustrated with his own paintings.

    Birdsall was interviewed on Radio Dundalk FM on Wednesday morning where he was introduced to listeners as “a very interesting man who combines painting, writing, whisky and a wee bit of camping”. 

    Birdsall reckons he visited about 22 existing distilleries and planned sites this summer. “Five years ago there was only about 4. This is definitely exciting times for the Irish whisky industry.” On his trip Birdsall visited distilleries during the day, collecting samples and tasting them at the end of the day after getting off the road.

    Wittenborg Writer Ben Birdsall's Adventures in Search of Good Irish Whisky Charms Radio ListenersHe concludes his trip on Saturday after starting off on 15 July. The book he plans to write is a sequel to his well-received travelogue/guide to Scottish whisky distilleries Whisky Burn – Distilleries of Scotland by Vespa which was published by Wittenborg University Press (WUP).

    According to Birdsall the trip went well save for a flat tyre coming out of Galway. “The Vespa also fell over once, breaking a wing mirror.” Otherwise things went relatively smoothly.. He managed to do about 11 paintings. “I use oil paint so the rain just washes off.”

    He mostly camped outside except that one time:  “I was coming into Cork and couldn’t find camp site. It was getting dark suddenly the Vespa stopped right outside a pub. It was like it just gave up and decided this is where we’re going to stay. Luckily there was a ...

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    Wittenborg News
    New Hotline for International Students with Housing Issues in Holland
    by Wittenborg News - Tuesday, 1 August 2017, 1:15 PM
     

    New Hotline for International Students with Housing Issues in Holland

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/new-hotline-international-students-housing-issues-holland.htm


    New Hotline for International Students with Housing Issues in HollandWith more than 112 000 international students studying in the Netherlands annually, finding good accommodation and keeping it can sometimes be a problem.

    Which is why the Dutch Student Union (LSVb) and the Erasmus Student Network has now set up a new hotline where international students can seek help if they have trouble finding accommodation, face conflict with a landlord or feel they are being discriminated against., wittenbo

    “We have encountered the craziest stories when it comes to international student housing in the Netherlands," says Tariq Sewbaransingh, chair of the LSVb. "For example, a sudden rent increase or payment for the maintenance of a room that does not even exist. The Housing Hotline provides a place for international students to ask their questions and voice their complaints."

    The language barrier is the biggest problem facing international students in the Netherlands. Advertisements, contracts and information concerning their rights as tenants are usually only available in Dutch, a statement by the LSVb reads.

    The Housing Hotline can be found here. Students can, for example, ask questions concerning finding a room, their rights or duties as a tenant, or how to deal with a conflict with their landlord. A team of volunteers and employees of the LSVb and ESN will answer by phone or mail on every request.

    The organisations will use the Housing Hotline data in anonymous form in order to map and study the problems they face. This rapport will be released sometime next year.

    WUP 1/8/2017

    by James Wittenborg
    ©Wittenborg University Press


    Wittenborg News
    Holland Inspires Logistics Student to Re-Introduce Biking Culture in Indonesia
    by Wittenborg News - Sunday, 30 July 2017, 1:59 PM
     

    Holland Inspires Logistics Student to Re-Introduce Biking Culture in Indonesia

    http://www.wittenborg.eu/holland-inspires-logistics-student-re-introduce-biking-culture-indonesia.htm


    Holland Inspires Logistics Student to Re-Introduce Biking Culture in IndonesiaIndonesian student Bertha Tanaem is so enamored by the Netherlands’ bicycle culture that she wants to re-introduce it back in Indonesia’s logistic industry, starting in her home-town Surabaya, in East-Java.

    “Logistics is my passion,” says the first-year student who joined Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences in 2016 following a bachelor's IBA in Logistics and International Trade.

    “I was working for my father for 6 years - he is in the freight forwarding business - before setting up for myself and starting a small company of my own, Elimada Global Logistik, with a team of 4 which is based in Surabaya.”

    Bertha recently worked as a volunteer at the world’s largest cycling conference – the 2017 Velo-City conference – which took place in Arnhem and Nijmegen. It was opened by the Dutch monarch, King Willem-Alexander.

    “I always had an interest in distribution and the opportunity to attend the Velo-City event as well as my personal observation in the Netherlands about "Fiets-Post" by Post NL, have made me see the concepts of logistics differently.

    “Doing deliveries by bike in the Netherlands works because of the country’s infrastructure. I would like to reintroduce the cycle culture back in Indonesia starting in Surabaya and hope when I go back to my hometown it will have a proper cycle path so I can implement Fiets-Post in Surabaya.”

    While volunteering she was particularly touched by two keynote speakers - Manfred Neun from the European Cyclists Federation (EFC) and Julia Nebrija Urban, an urban planner in the Philippines. “Both spoke about ‘bike-conomics’. Neun gave a run-down of cost-saving in connecting the suburb to the city using a proper bike-path. Nebrija spoke about her difficulties ...

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